Swimming performance of juvenile Florida pompano after sublethal exposure to ethylene glycol and methanol: Synergistic effects

M. A. Stead, D. M. Baltz, E. J. Chesney, M. A. Tarr, A. S. Kolok, B. D. Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemical additives for enhancing deepwater (>305-m) petrochemical production, such as ethylene glycol and methanol, are used to prevent the formation of gas hydrates in deepwater wells and pipelines and pose threats to marine faunas. Juvenile Florida pompano Trachinotus carolinus were used in controlled experiments to test the effects of 3.0% (volume per volume) ethylene glycol, 1.07% methanol, and a combination of the two chemicals on the swimming performance of individuals. We quantified the sublethal effects of contaminants by comparing differences in pre- and postexposure critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) among treatment and control groups. In juvenile swimming performance tests, single exposure to ethylene glycol and to the combination of ethylene glycol and methanol significantly reduced mean Ucrit by 13.4% and 41.1%, respectively. No detectable difference in Ucrit was found for control groups or juveniles exposed solely to methanol. The sublethal effects of single exposures to ethylene glycol and methanol were increased synergistically more than threefold when juveniles were exposed to the contaminants in combination. The reduced ability to sustain high and prolonged performance levels could affect an individual's ability to avoid predators and feed effectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1438-1447
Number of pages10
JournalTransactions of the American Fisheries Society
Volume134
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005

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ethylene glycol
ethylene
methanol
sublethal effect
sublethal effects
Trachinotus carolinus
petrochemicals
pollutant
gas hydrate
testing
exposure
effect
fauna
predator
predators
well
experiment
chemical
test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Swimming performance of juvenile Florida pompano after sublethal exposure to ethylene glycol and methanol : Synergistic effects. / Stead, M. A.; Baltz, D. M.; Chesney, E. J.; Tarr, M. A.; Kolok, A. S.; Marx, B. D.

In: Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, Vol. 134, No. 6, 01.11.2005, p. 1438-1447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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