Surgical resident education

What is the department's price for commitment?

Michael P. Meara, Lisa L Schlitzkus, Mitzi Witherington, Carl Haisch, Michael F. Rotondo, Paul J Schenarts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The current recession has impacted all aspects of our economy. Some residency programs have experienced faculty salary cuts, furlough days, and cessation of funding for travel to academic meetings. This milieu forced many residency programs to reevaluate their commitment to resident education, particularly for those expenses not provided for by Direct Medical Education (DME) and Indirect Medical Education (IME) funds. The purpose of this study was to determine what price a Department of Surgery pays to fulfill its commitment to resident education. Design: A financial analysis of 1 academic year was performed for all expenses not covered by DME or IME funds and is paid for by the faculty practice plan. These expenses were categorized and further analyzed to determine the funds required for resident-related scholarly activity. Setting: A university-based general surgery residency program. Participants: Twenty-eight surgical residents and a program coordinator. Results: The departmental faculty provided $153,141 during 1 academic year to support the educational mission of the residency. This amount is in addition to the $1.6 million in faculty time, $850,000 provided by the federal government in terms of DME funds, and $14 million of IME funds, which are distributed on an institutional basis. Resident presentations at scientific meetings accounted for $49,672, and program coordinator costs of $44,190 accounted for nearly two-thirds of this funding. The departmental faculty committed $6400 per categorical resident. Conclusions: In addition to DME and IME funds, a department of surgery must commit significant additional monies to meet the educational goals of surgical residency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-431
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume67
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Medical Education
Financial Management
commitment
resident
Education
Internship and Residency
education
surgery
Federal Government
funding
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
salary
recession
Costs and Cost Analysis
money
travel
economy
university
costs

Keywords

  • Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies
  • financial cost
  • surgical education
  • surgical residency
  • surgical residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

Surgical resident education : What is the department's price for commitment? / Meara, Michael P.; Schlitzkus, Lisa L; Witherington, Mitzi; Haisch, Carl; Rotondo, Michael F.; Schenarts, Paul J.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 67, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 427-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meara, Michael P. ; Schlitzkus, Lisa L ; Witherington, Mitzi ; Haisch, Carl ; Rotondo, Michael F. ; Schenarts, Paul J. / Surgical resident education : What is the department's price for commitment?. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2010 ; Vol. 67, No. 6. pp. 427-431.
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