Suppressor cell activity in primary biliary cirrhosis

Rowen K Zetterman, John A. Woltjen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent evidence has suggested that peripheral blood suppressor cell populations can modulate immune responsiveness. Absence of suppressor cell activity has been noted in diseases of presumed autoimmune basis. We determined inducible suppressor cell activity in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) as compared to age and sex-matched controls. There was a significant loss of suppressor cell activity for mitogen response in patients with PBC (-4.5±8.0%) versus controls (43.7±7.8%). No correlation of this loss to clinical parameters was observed. This study suggests PBC patients lack inducible suppressor cell activity. Such loss could allow continued reactivity to hepatic autoantigens and might provide partial explanation for the perpetuation of this disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-107
Number of pages4
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 1980

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Biliary Liver Cirrhosis
Mitogens
Autoimmune Diseases
Blood Cells
Liver
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Suppressor cell activity in primary biliary cirrhosis. / Zetterman, Rowen K; Woltjen, John A.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.02.1980, p. 104-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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