Substrate-mediated delivery from self-assembled monolayers: Effect of surface ionization, hydrophilicity, and patterning

Angela K. Pannier, Brian C. Anderson, Lonnie D. Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gene transfer has many potential applications in basic and applied sciences. In vitro, DNA delivery can be enhanced by increasing the concentration of DNA in the cellular microenvironment through immobilization of DNA to a substrate that supports cell adhesion. Substrate-mediated delivery describes the immobilization of DNA, complexed with cationic lipids or polymers, to a biomaterial or substrate. As surface properties are critical to the efficiency of the surface delivery approach, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold were used to correlate surface chemistry of the substrate to binding, release, and transfection of non-specifically immobilized complexes. Surface hydrophobicity and ionization were found to mediate both DNA complex immobilization and transfection, but had no effect on complex release. Additionally, SAMs were used in conjunction with soft lithographic techniques to imprint substrates with specific patterns, resulting in patterned DNA complex deposition and transfection, with transfection efficiencies in the patterns nearing 40%. Controlling the interactions between complexes and substrates, with the potential for patterned delivery, can be used to locally enhance or regulate gene transfer, with applications to tissue engineering scaffolds and transfected cell arrays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-522
Number of pages12
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Volume1
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Fingerprint

Hydrophilicity
Self assembled monolayers
Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Ionization
DNA
Transfection
Substrates
Immobilization
Gene transfer
Tissue Scaffolds
Cellular Microenvironment
Surface Properties
Cell adhesion
Biocompatible Materials
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Hydrophobicity
Surface chemistry
Tissue engineering
Biomaterials

Keywords

  • Gene delivery
  • Reverse transfection
  • Self-assembled monolayers
  • Solid-phase delivery
  • Substrate mediated

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Substrate-mediated delivery from self-assembled monolayers : Effect of surface ionization, hydrophilicity, and patterning. / Pannier, Angela K.; Anderson, Brian C.; Shea, Lonnie D.

In: Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 1, No. 5, 01.09.2005, p. 511-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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