Submicron bioactive glass tubes for bone tissue engineering

Jingwei Xie, Eric R. Blough, Chi Hwa Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Herein we describe a method to fabricate submicron bioactive glass tubes using sol-gel and coaxial electrospinning techniques for applications in bone tissue engineering. Heavy mineral oil and gel solution were delivered by two independent syringe pumps during the coaxial electrospinning process. Subsequently, submicron bioactive glass tubes were obtained by removal of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) and heavy mineral oil via calcination at 600°C for 5 h. Tubular structure was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy imaging. We examined the bioactivity of submicron bioactive glass tubes and fibers and evaluated their biocompatibility, using electrospun poly(-caprolactone) fibers - a bioinactive material - for comparison. The bioactivity of the glass tubes was examined in a simulated body fluid and they demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite-like minerals on both the outer and inner surfaces. In contrast, mineralization only occurred on their surface for bioactive glass solid fibers. Energy-dispersive X-ray data suggested that the bioactive glass tubes had a faster induction of mineral formation than the solid fibers. We demonstrate that the proliferation rate of mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells on bioactive glass tubes was comparable to that on solid fibers. We also show that bioactive glass tubes can be loaded with a model protein drug, bovine serum albumin, and that these structures exhibit delayed release properties. The bioactivity of released lysozyme can be as high as 90.9%. Taken together, these data suggest that submicron bioactive glass tubes could hold great potential for use in bone tissue engineering as well as topical drug or gene delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)811-819
Number of pages9
JournalActa Biomaterialia
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

Fingerprint

Bioactive glass
Tissue Engineering
Tissue engineering
Glass
Bone
Bone and Bones
Bioactivity
Fibers
Mineral Oil
Mineral oils
Electrospinning
Minerals
Gels
Pyrrolidinones
Syringes
Body Fluids
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Durapatite
Muramidase
Bovine Serum Albumin

Keywords

  • Bioactive glass
  • Bone tissue engineering
  • Drug delivery
  • Electrospinning
  • Submicron tubes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Submicron bioactive glass tubes for bone tissue engineering. / Xie, Jingwei; Blough, Eric R.; Wang, Chi Hwa.

In: Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.02.2012, p. 811-819.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xie, Jingwei ; Blough, Eric R. ; Wang, Chi Hwa. / Submicron bioactive glass tubes for bone tissue engineering. In: Acta Biomaterialia. 2012 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 811-819.
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