Subject pronoun and article omissions in the speech of children with specific language impairment

A phonological interpretation

Karla McGregor, L. B. Leonard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) and their MLU-matched normally developing (ND) peers imitated proper nouns, the pronouns he and you, and the article the in subject phrases. Although all of these word types were phonological phrase-initial syllables, the proper nouns received strong stress, but the function words received weak stress. Both groups of children showed significantly more omissions of the function words than the proper nouns. There was no significant difference amongst the imitations of the two pronouns or the article; all were omitted frequently by both groups. This suggests that the status of subject articles and pronouns as weak syllables in the initial position of phonological phrases may in some cases constitute a more important factor than the distinctive grammatical roles they play. A phonological explanation of subject article and pronoun omissions is explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-181
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Speech and Hearing Research
Volume37
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Articulation Disorders
Language
interpretation
language
imitation
role play
Group
Pronoun
Omission
Specific Language Impairment
Subject Pronoun
Proper Nouns

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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