Students’ evaluations of the effectiveness of substance abuse education

The impact of different delivery modes

Cass Dykeman, James R Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ninety-six students, 12 boys and 12 girls each from the 3rd, 6th, 8th, and 12th grades were interviewed regarding the effectiveness of various delivery modes commonly employed in substance abuse education. These delivery modes included (a) expert-led, (b) teacher-led, (c) peer-led, and (d) parent in-home. Students generally believed that each type of delivery mode would positively effect drug- and alcohol-related knowledge but not behavior. Furthermore, students believed that the expert-led mode would be the most effective means for positively effecting the drug- and alcohol-related knowledge of students. The implications of these results for school based drug and alcohol prevention efforts are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-61
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 14 1996

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substance abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Students
Education
alcohol
Alcohols
drug
evaluation
education
student
Pharmaceutical Preparations
expert
parents
school grade
teacher
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Psychology(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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