Strategies for relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma: The tail that wags the curve

Matthew A. Lunning, Alison J. Moskowitz, Steven Horwitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 69-year-old woman was referred for further evaluation and management of relapsed angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. At diagnosis, she received six cycles of dose-adjusted EPOCH (etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin) and achieved a complete response (CR). Her first surveillance computed tomography scan 3 months later demonstrated enlarging cervical lymphadenopathy. A lymph node excision confirmed relapsed angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphoma with atypical lymphocytes expressing CD3, CD4, CD10, PD-1, and EBER, with loss of CD5(Fig1). A clonal T-cell receptor beta and gamma rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction was identical to that in her initial diagnostic biopsy. At our initial consultation, options for standard as well as investigational therapies were discussed, and HLA typing was initiated. The patient was enrolled onto an investigational phase II study; however, she developed progressive disease after two cycles. She was then treated with romidepsin 14mg/m2administered intravenously for 3 consecutive weeks with 1 week off. After two cycles, she achieved a partial response, and after four additional cycles, she maintained her response without further improvement. We discussed additional treatment options.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1922-1927
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume31
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

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Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma
T-Cell Lymphoma
Histocompatibility Testing
Investigational Therapies
Vincristine
Etoposide
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Prednisone
Lymph Node Excision
Doxorubicin
Cyclophosphamide
Referral and Consultation
Tomography
Lymphocytes
Biopsy
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Therapeutics
romidepsin
Lymphadenopathy
Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNA 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Strategies for relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma : The tail that wags the curve. / Lunning, Matthew A.; Moskowitz, Alison J.; Horwitz, Steven.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 31, No. 16, 01.06.2013, p. 1922-1927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lunning, Matthew A. ; Moskowitz, Alison J. ; Horwitz, Steven. / Strategies for relapsed peripheral T-cell lymphoma : The tail that wags the curve. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 16. pp. 1922-1927.
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