Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants

Ira H. Gewolb, Richard S. Schwalbe, Vicki L. Taciak, Tracy S. Harrison, Pinaki Panigrahi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

269 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim - To serially characterise aerobic and anaerobic stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants and to correlate colonisation patterns with clinical risk factors. Methods - Stool specimens from 29 infants of birthweight <1000 g were collected on days 10, 20, and 30 after birth. Quantitative aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed. Results - By day 30, predominant species were Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria spp were identified in only one infant. In breast milk fed (but not in formula fed) infants, the total number of bacterial species/stool specimen increased significantly with time (2.50 (SE 0.34) on day 10; 3.13 (0.38) on day 20; 4.27 (0.45) on day 30) as did quantitative bacterial counts; Gram negative species accounted for most of the increase. On day 30, significant inverse correlations were found between days of previous antibiotic treatment and number of bacterial species (r=0.491) and total organisms/g of stool (r=0.482). Gestational age, birthweight, maternal antibiotic or steroid treatment, prolonged rupture of the membranes, and mode of delivery did not seem to affect colonisation patterns. Conclusions - The gut of extremely low birthweight infants is colonised by a paucity of bacterial species. Breast milking and reduction of antibiotic exposure are critical to increasing fecal microbial diversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)F167-F173
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Anti-Bacterial Agents
Staphylococcus haemolyticus
Enterobacter cloacae
Infant Formula
Bifidobacterium
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Bacterial Load
Enterococcus faecalis
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Lactobacillus
Human Milk
Gestational Age
Rupture
Breast
Steroids
Mothers
Parturition
Escherichia coli
Membranes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Breast milk
  • Enteric bacterial colonisation
  • Premature infant
  • Stool

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Gewolb, I. H., Schwalbe, R. S., Taciak, V. L., Harrison, T. S., & Panigrahi, P. (1999). Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants. Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, 80(3), F167-F173. https://doi.org/10.1136/fn.80.3.F167

Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants. / Gewolb, Ira H.; Schwalbe, Richard S.; Taciak, Vicki L.; Harrison, Tracy S.; Panigrahi, Pinaki.

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, Vol. 80, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. F167-F173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gewolb, IH, Schwalbe, RS, Taciak, VL, Harrison, TS & Panigrahi, P 1999, 'Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants', Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, vol. 80, no. 3, pp. F167-F173. https://doi.org/10.1136/fn.80.3.F167
Gewolb, Ira H. ; Schwalbe, Richard S. ; Taciak, Vicki L. ; Harrison, Tracy S. ; Panigrahi, Pinaki. / Stool microflora in extremely low birthweight infants. In: Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition. 1999 ; Vol. 80, No. 3. pp. F167-F173.
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