Stimulus redundancy and immediate recall

John C. Jahnke, Ronald H. Nowaczyk, William Wozniak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined immediate recall in two stimulus prefix and two stimulus suffix conditions and in a condition that combined a prefix and suffix. Suffixes and the combination of a prefix with a suffix interfered more with recall overall than did prefixes. Performance in each of the conditions that included a prefix was significantly better overall than in appropriate control conditions, in which interference was augmented by a redundant element in recall. It was suggested that prefixes and suffixes lie operationally on a continuum and that their effects result from the subject's inability to dissociate the redundant element from the memory series. However, the location of redundancy imposes different processing requirements that differentially influence recall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-360
Number of pages4
JournalMemory & Cognition
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1976

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Short-Term Memory
benzoylprop-ethyl
Stimulus
Prefix
Redundancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Stimulus redundancy and immediate recall. / Jahnke, John C.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.; Wozniak, William.

In: Memory & Cognition, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.07.1976, p. 357-360.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jahnke, John C. ; Nowaczyk, Ronald H. ; Wozniak, William. / Stimulus redundancy and immediate recall. In: Memory & Cognition. 1976 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 357-360.
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