State-dependent AMPA receptor trafficking in the mammalian retina

Yingqiu Xia, Reed C. Carroll, Scott A Nawy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rapid cycling of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) at the membrane maintains synaptic transmission at a number of CNS synapses and may play a role in several forms of synaptic plasticity. It is unclear, however, how prevalent the trafficking of AMPARs is in the CNS, particularly at synapses not known to exhibit activity-dependent plasticity. Because trafficking is regulated by basal synaptic activity, a question also remains as to how receptor trafficking is modulated at synapses subject to different patterns of synaptic activation. We have investigated whether trafficking of AMPARs occurs in retinal neurons, which are subject to tonic glutamate release. We find two distinct states of AMPAR trafficking in ON ganglion cells. Light adaptation serves to stabilize AMPARs in a noncycling mode. However, dark adaptation for as little as 8 h triggers a switch to a second state of trafficking characterized by rapid cycling. We provide evidence that the activation of AMPARs is critical for switching between cycling and noncycling states. The induction of cycling further appears to be modulated by changes in the function of glutamate receptor 2/3-interacting proteins. Our results suggest that there is a strong link between synaptic activity and AMPAR trafficking in retinal neurons. These results further suggest the existence of a previously unknown form of activity-dependent plasticity in the retina that may be regulated in the course of a normal light/dark cycle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5028-5036
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume26
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2006

Fingerprint

AMPA Receptors
Retina
Synapses
Retinal Neurons
Ocular Adaptation
Dark Adaptation
Neurotransmitter Receptor
Neuronal Plasticity
Photoperiod
Glutamate Receptors
Synaptic Transmission
Ganglia
Glutamic Acid
Membranes

Keywords

  • AMPA receptor
  • Activity
  • Dynamin
  • GRIP
  • Ganglion cell
  • Light
  • Mouse
  • PICK1
  • Retina
  • SVKI
  • Trafficking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

State-dependent AMPA receptor trafficking in the mammalian retina. / Xia, Yingqiu; Carroll, Reed C.; Nawy, Scott A.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 26, No. 19, 07.09.2006, p. 5028-5036.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xia, Yingqiu ; Carroll, Reed C. ; Nawy, Scott A. / State-dependent AMPA receptor trafficking in the mammalian retina. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2006 ; Vol. 26, No. 19. pp. 5028-5036.
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