Starch-entrapped microspheres show a beneficial fermentation profile and decrease in potentially harmful bacteria during in vitro fermentation in faecal microbiota obtained from patients with inflammatory bowel disease

Devin J. Rose, Koen Venema, Ali Keshavarzian, Bruce R. Hamaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that starch-entrapped microspheres would produce favourable fermentation profiles and microbial shifts during in vitro fermentation with the faecal microbiota from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vitro fermentation was carried out using a validated, dynamic, computer-controlled model of the human colon (Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek gastro-intestinal model-2) after inoculation with pooled faeces from healthy individuals, patients with inactive IBD (Crohn's disease (CD)) or patients with active IBD (ulcerative colitis (UC)). Starch-entrapped microspheres fermented more slowly and produced more butyrate than fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) when fermented with the faecal microbiota from patients with active UC. When fermented with the microbiota from patients with inactive CD, starch-entrapped microspheres also fermented more slowly but produced similar amounts of butyrate compared with FOS. Starch-entrapped microspheres showed a greater ability to maintain a low pH during simulated-distal colon conditions compared with FOS. After fermentation with the microbiota from inactive CD patients, starch-entrapped microspheres resulted in lower concentrations of some potentially harmful gut bacteria, included in Bacteroides, Enterococcus, Fusobacterium and Veillonella, compared with FOS. These findings suggest that slow fermenting starch-entrapped microspheres may induce a favourable colonic environment in patients with IBD through high butyrate production, maintenance of low pH in the distal colon and inhibition of the growth of potentially harmful bacteria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1514-1524
Number of pages11
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume103
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Microspheres
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Starch
Fermentation
Bacteria
Oligosaccharides
Butyrates
Crohn Disease
Colon
Ulcerative Colitis
Veillonella
Fusobacterium
Bacteroides
Enterococcus
In Vitro Techniques
Feces
Computer Simulation
Maintenance
Growth

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Butyrate
  • Colon
  • Crohn's disease
  • Encapsulation
  • Ulcerative colitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that starch-entrapped microspheres would produce favourable fermentation profiles and microbial shifts during in vitro fermentation with the faecal microbiota from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vitro fermentation was carried out using a validated, dynamic, computer-controlled model of the human colon (Toegepast Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek gastro-intestinal model-2) after inoculation with pooled faeces from healthy individuals, patients with inactive IBD (Crohn's disease (CD)) or patients with active IBD (ulcerative colitis (UC)). Starch-entrapped microspheres fermented more slowly and produced more butyrate than fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) when fermented with the faecal microbiota from patients with active UC. When fermented with the microbiota from patients with inactive CD, starch-entrapped microspheres also fermented more slowly but produced similar amounts of butyrate compared with FOS. Starch-entrapped microspheres showed a greater ability to maintain a low pH during simulated-distal colon conditions compared with FOS. After fermentation with the microbiota from inactive CD patients, starch-entrapped microspheres resulted in lower concentrations of some potentially harmful gut bacteria, included in Bacteroides, Enterococcus, Fusobacterium and Veillonella, compared with FOS. These findings suggest that slow fermenting starch-entrapped microspheres may induce a favourable colonic environment in patients with IBD through high butyrate production, maintenance of low pH in the distal colon and inhibition of the growth of potentially harmful bacteria.",
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