Starch-entrapped microspheres extend in vitro fecal fermentation, increase butyrate production, and influence microbiota pattern

Devin J Rose, Ali Keshavarzian, John A. Patterson, Mahesh Venkatachalam, Patrick Gillevet, Bruce R. Hamaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research has revealed that waxy corn starch which has been entrapped in a matrix of electrostatically cross-linked alginate, shows a slow digestion rate such that much of the starch may reach the colon; thus making this a new type of resistant starch. The purpose of this research was to test the fermentative properties of starch-entrapped microspheres using a batch fecal fermentation method. Fermentation of starch-entrapped microspheres showed significantly lower rates of gas production compared to waxy corn starch, and showed significant increases in total SCFAs during the latter stages of fermentation (24-48 h), whereas waxy corn starch did not. Cooking the starch-entrapped microspheres increased the amount of SCFAs and the molar fraction of butyrate produced during fermentation. Bacterial fingerprinting revealed that uncooked starch-entrapped microspheres have a unique effect on the microbiota that is different from waxy corn starch alone, but cooking causes a shift toward a pattern more closely resembling that of the starch. Starch-entrapped microspheres may deliver slowly fermentable carbohydrate to the colon, with the ability to influence the microbiota. Further human studies are required to determine whether these characteristics occur in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
Volume53
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Butyrates
Microbiota
butyrates
Microspheres
Starch
Fermentation
fermentation
waxy corn
starch
microorganisms
corn starch
Zea mays
colon
cooking
Cooking
gas production (biological)
resistant starch
alginates
In Vitro Techniques
Colon

Keywords

  • Butyrate
  • Colon
  • Encapsulation
  • Resistant starch
  • Short chain fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science

Cite this

Starch-entrapped microspheres extend in vitro fecal fermentation, increase butyrate production, and influence microbiota pattern. / Rose, Devin J; Keshavarzian, Ali; Patterson, John A.; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Gillevet, Patrick; Hamaker, Bruce R.

In: Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, Vol. 53, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.05.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rose, Devin J ; Keshavarzian, Ali ; Patterson, John A. ; Venkatachalam, Mahesh ; Gillevet, Patrick ; Hamaker, Bruce R. / Starch-entrapped microspheres extend in vitro fecal fermentation, increase butyrate production, and influence microbiota pattern. In: Molecular Nutrition and Food Research. 2009 ; Vol. 53, No. SUPPL. 1.
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