Soil phosphorus distribution as affected by manure compost phosphorus concentration and incorporation

Dennis L. McCallister, Jason A. Larson, Daniel T. Walters, David B. Marx, Christina Gossin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Phosphorus (P) from manure can become an environmental pollutant if applied to soil at rates in excess of plant uptake. This research examined the effects of composted beef cattle manures from two feeding regimens on soil P storage and forms. Composted manures were applied in the spring before planting (preplant) with incorporation, in spring after planting (postplant) without incorporation, or in winter without incorporation. Soils were sampled following 1 and 2 years of treatment at depths to 15.0 cm. All P fractions from both composted manures increased over pre-amended levels. High-P composted manure increased total P (TP) and inorganic P (IP) more than low-P composted manure. Total P and IP were greater in soils receiving low-P composted manure postplant than in those receiving manure preplant. Accumulation of TP and IP in uppermost depths was greater in the second year of composted manure application than in the first year. Appropriately managing composted manure requires integrating P concentration, time of application, and incorporation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-734
Number of pages14
JournalCommunications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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composted manure
compost
manure
phosphorus
soil
animal manures
planting
cattle manure
distribution
incorporation
beef cattle
pollutants
winter

Keywords

  • Beef cattle dietary P
  • Manure P
  • P mineralization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Soil phosphorus distribution as affected by manure compost phosphorus concentration and incorporation. / McCallister, Dennis L.; Larson, Jason A.; Walters, Daniel T.; Marx, David B.; Gossin, Christina.

In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.01.2010, p. 721-734.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McCallister, Dennis L. ; Larson, Jason A. ; Walters, Daniel T. ; Marx, David B. ; Gossin, Christina. / Soil phosphorus distribution as affected by manure compost phosphorus concentration and incorporation. In: Communications in Soil Science and Plant Analysis. 2010 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 721-734.
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