Socioeconomic position and abrupt versus gradual method of quitting smoking: Findings from the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey

Mohammad Siahpush, Hua Hie Yong, Ron Borland, Jessica L. Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Our aim was to investigate the association between socioeconomic position (income and education) and abrupt versus gradual method of smoking cessation. Methods: The analysis used data (n = 5,629) from Waves 1 through 6 (2002-2008) of the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey, a prospective study of a cohort of smokers in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Results: Logistic regression analyses using generalized estimating equations showed that higher income (p < .001) and higher education (p = .011) were associated with a higher probability of abrupt versus gradual quitting. The odds of adopting abrupt versus gradual quitting were about 40% higher among respondents with high income ($60,000 and more in the United States/Canada/Australia and £30,000 and more in the United Kingdom) compared with those with low income (less than $30,000 in the United States/Canada/Australia; £15,000 and less in the United Kingdom). Similarly, the odds of abrupt versus gradual quitting were about 30% higher among respondents with a high level of education (university degree) compared with those with a low level of education (high school diploma or lower). Discussion: Higher socioeconomic position is associated with a higher probability of quitting abruptly rather than gradually reducing smoking before quitting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S58-S63
JournalNicotine and Tobacco Research
Volume12
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

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Tobacco
Smoking
Canada
Education
Smoking Cessation
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Socioeconomic position and abrupt versus gradual method of quitting smoking : Findings from the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey. / Siahpush, Mohammad; Yong, Hua Hie; Borland, Ron; Reid, Jessica L.

In: Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 12, No. SUPPL. 1, 01.10.2010, p. S58-S63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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