Social determinants of HIV-related stigma in faith-based organizations

Jason D. Coleman, Allan D. Tate, Bambi Gaddist, Jacob White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To examine the association between social factors in faith-based settings (including religiosity and proximity to people living with HIV/AIDS) and HIV stigma. Methods. A total of 1747 congregants from primarily African American faith-based organizations of Project FAITH (Fostering AIDS Initiatives That Heal), a South Carolina statewide initiative to address HIV-related stigma, completed a survey. Results. Female gender (P = .001), higher education (P <.001), knowing someone with HIV/AIDS (P = .01), and knowing someone who is gay (P <.001), but not religiosity, were associated with lower levelsof stigma and with lower oddsof stigmatizing attitudes (P <.05). Conclusions. Opportunities for connection with people living with HIV/AIDS tailored to the social characteristics of faith-based organizations may address HIV stigma in African American communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)492-496
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume106
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2016

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HIV
Organizations
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
African Americans
Foster Home Care
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Social determinants of HIV-related stigma in faith-based organizations. / Coleman, Jason D.; Tate, Allan D.; Gaddist, Bambi; White, Jacob.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 106, No. 3, 03.2016, p. 492-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coleman, Jason D. ; Tate, Allan D. ; Gaddist, Bambi ; White, Jacob. / Social determinants of HIV-related stigma in faith-based organizations. In: American journal of public health. 2016 ; Vol. 106, No. 3. pp. 492-496.
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