Social deference and hunger as mechanisms for starvation avoidance in cognitive radio societies

Anna Wisniewska, Bilal Khan, Ala Al-Fuqaha, Kirk Dombrowski, Mohammad Abu Shattal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wireless communication is an increasingly ubiquitous and important resource substrate of the digital ecosystem. In the face of the rapid growth in the population of Internet of Things (IoT), however, uncoordinated access to limited resources of radio spectrum is likely to lead to mass starvation. Here we put forward a new bio-social paradigm for cognitive radio, extending previous models in which the secondary users of spectrum alternate stochastically between foraging and consuming behaviors. In this paper, we ask and resolve two questions: (1) What costs and benefits does social deference to the group yield for each of the individuals therein? and (2) Can a notion of individual 'hunger' form the basis of a distributed social deference scheme that is free of group coordination costs? Through a series of simulation experiments grounded in a well-specified formal model, we show that social deference improves both the fairness and the reliability of spectrum resource allocation, and moreover, that the concept of individual 'hunger' can be used to implement social deference with minimal group coordination overhead. The results have consequences both in suggesting potential improvements for distributed spectrum access, and in understanding the evolutionary pressures on the behaviors of individual devices within emerging digital IoT societies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1063-1068
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781509003044
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 26 2016
Event12th IEEE International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016 - Paphos, Cyprus
Duration: Sep 5 2016Sep 9 2016

Publication series

Name2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016

Other

Other12th IEEE International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016
CountryCyprus
CityPaphos
Period9/5/169/9/16

Fingerprint

Cognitive radio
Ecosystems
Resource allocation
Costs
Communication
Substrates
Experiments
Internet of things

Keywords

  • Bio-social networking
  • Cognitive radio networks
  • Contention-sensing
  • Dynamic spectrum access
  • Internet of Things
  • Self-coexistence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Wisniewska, A., Khan, B., Al-Fuqaha, A., Dombrowski, K., & Shattal, M. A. (2016). Social deference and hunger as mechanisms for starvation avoidance in cognitive radio societies. In 2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016 (pp. 1063-1068). [7577206] (2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/IWCMC.2016.7577206

Social deference and hunger as mechanisms for starvation avoidance in cognitive radio societies. / Wisniewska, Anna; Khan, Bilal; Al-Fuqaha, Ala; Dombrowski, Kirk; Shattal, Mohammad Abu.

2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. p. 1063-1068 7577206 (2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wisniewska, A, Khan, B, Al-Fuqaha, A, Dombrowski, K & Shattal, MA 2016, Social deference and hunger as mechanisms for starvation avoidance in cognitive radio societies. in 2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016., 7577206, 2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 1063-1068, 12th IEEE International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016, Paphos, Cyprus, 9/5/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/IWCMC.2016.7577206
Wisniewska A, Khan B, Al-Fuqaha A, Dombrowski K, Shattal MA. Social deference and hunger as mechanisms for starvation avoidance in cognitive radio societies. In 2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2016. p. 1063-1068. 7577206. (2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016). https://doi.org/10.1109/IWCMC.2016.7577206
Wisniewska, Anna ; Khan, Bilal ; Al-Fuqaha, Ala ; Dombrowski, Kirk ; Shattal, Mohammad Abu. / Social deference and hunger as mechanisms for starvation avoidance in cognitive radio societies. 2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. pp. 1063-1068 (2016 International Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing Conference, IWCMC 2016).
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