Social complexity and transitive inference in corvids

Alan B. Bond, Alan C. Kamil, Russell P. Balda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

175 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The social complexity hypothesis asserts that animals living in large social groups should display enhanced cognitive abilities along predictable dimensions. To test this concept, we compared highly social pinyon jays, Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus, with relatively nonsocial western scrub-jays, Aphelocoma californica, on two complex cognitive tasks relevant to the ability to track and assess social relationships. Pinyon jays learned to track multiple dyadic relationships more rapidly and more accurately than scrub-jays and appeared to display a more robust and accurate mechanism of transitive inference. These results provide a clear demonstration of the association between social complexity and cognition in animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-487
Number of pages9
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume65
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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scrub
animal
cognition
shrublands
animals
testing
Aphelocoma californica
test
social group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Social complexity and transitive inference in corvids. / Bond, Alan B.; Kamil, Alan C.; Balda, Russell P.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 65, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 479-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bond, AB, Kamil, AC & Balda, RP 2003, 'Social complexity and transitive inference in corvids', Animal Behaviour, vol. 65, no. 3, pp. 479-487. https://doi.org/10.1006/anbe.2003.2101
Bond, Alan B. ; Kamil, Alan C. ; Balda, Russell P. / Social complexity and transitive inference in corvids. In: Animal Behaviour. 2003 ; Vol. 65, No. 3. pp. 479-487.
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