Social anxiety, recall of interpersonal information, and social impact on others

Debra A Hope, K. D. Sigler, D. L. Penn, V. Meier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study sought to replicate and extend a previous study in which social anxiety was associated with poorer recall of the details of a social interaction as well as to test various hypotheses derived from Trower and Gilbert's psychobiological/ethological theory of social anxiety. Socially anxious and nonanxious undergraduate students participated in a heterosocial conversation with a confederate under the observation of a second subject. Consistent with the previous study, there was some evidence that social anxiety was associated with poorer recall of interaction details for women. Social anxiety and recall were unrelated for men. Men demonstrated poorer recall than women overall. The hypotheses derived from Trower and Gilbert's theory were largely supported, suggesting socially anxious individuals view social interactions as competitive endeavors in which they are ill equipped to challenge the other person. Rather, they adopt self-effacing strategies, but still doubt their success. Finally, the judgments of nonanxious individuals about their impact on others appeared to be positively biased. Implications for cognitive theories of social anxiety are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-322
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

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Social Change
Anxiety
Interpersonal Relations
Observation
Students
Social Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Social anxiety, recall of interpersonal information, and social impact on others. / Hope, Debra A; Sigler, K. D.; Penn, D. L.; Meier, V.

In: Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.01.1998, p. 303-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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