Snoring in preschoolers: Associations with sleepiness, ethnicity, and learning

Hawley E. Montgomery-Downs, V. Faye Jones, Victoria J. Molfese, David Gozal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children is associated with poor school performance, with minority children being at increased risk for both conditions. The latter have been attributable to low socio-economic status (SES). To further study these relationships, the contribution of SES to SDB and learning was examined in 1,010 validated questionnaires collected from parents of both white and African-American low-SES preschoolers. Twenty-two percent of disadvantaged preschoolers were reported to be at risk for SDB. These children were more likely to be African American, and had a higher incidence of daytime sleepiness, lower academic performance, and hyperactixity. Maternal education level did not account for these differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-726
Number of pages8
JournalClinical pediatrics
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2003

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Snoring
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Economics
Learning
African Americans
Vulnerable Populations
Parents
Mothers
Education
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Snoring in preschoolers : Associations with sleepiness, ethnicity, and learning. / Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.; Jones, V. Faye; Molfese, Victoria J.; Gozal, David.

In: Clinical pediatrics, Vol. 42, No. 8, 10.2003, p. 719-726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E. ; Jones, V. Faye ; Molfese, Victoria J. ; Gozal, David. / Snoring in preschoolers : Associations with sleepiness, ethnicity, and learning. In: Clinical pediatrics. 2003 ; Vol. 42, No. 8. pp. 719-726.
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