Smoking and supplement use among men in a rural population

Abe E. Sahmoun, Gary Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few studies have investigated supplement use in relation to smoking among men in a rural population. Methods: We analyzed responses about the use of supplements from a cross-sectional, population-based sample of 4,502 North Dakota men. Results: 48% of respondents reported supplement use. After adjustment for confounders, supplement users were significantly more likely to be nonsmokers or former smokers than smokers (p <.0001) and to consume five or more daily servings of fruits and vegetables (p =.0003). Conclusion: Compared to nonsmoking rural men, supplement use is significantly less common among rural smokers. Rural smokers also are less likely to consume five or more daily servings of fruits and vegetables and may be at greater risk of vitamin deficiency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-289
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Dietary Supplements
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

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rural population
Rural Population
Smoking
Vegetables
Fruit
vegetables
vitamin deficiencies
Avitaminosis
fruits
Population
sampling
methodology

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Guidelines
  • Men
  • Prevention
  • Rural health
  • Smoking
  • Supplements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Smoking and supplement use among men in a rural population. / Sahmoun, Abe E.; Schwartz, Gary.

In: Journal of Dietary Supplements, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.10.2009, p. 280-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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