Sitting postural control affects the development of focused attention in children with cerebral palsy

Swati M. Surkar, Christina Edelbrock, Nicholas Stergiou, Sarah Berger, Regina Harbourne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether focused attention (FA) changes over time as sitting postural control improves and whether an impairment in sitting postural control affects the development of FA in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Nineteen children with CP, mean ages 21.47 months, were assessed for FA and sitting scores pre- and postintervention. Results: Longest, total, and global FA increased and frequency of FA decreased in children who achieved independent sitting. However, children who achieved mobility postintervention exhibited a decrease in longest FA and an increase in frequency of FA. Conclusion: Sitting postural control and the development of FA appear associated in children with CP. The increase in FA may signal a key opportunity for learning and attending to objects. However, the time of early mobility may interrupt these long periods of attention, resulting in less sustained attention to objects. (Pediatr Phys Ther 2015;27:16-22) Key words: attention, cerebral palsy, child, cognition, growth and development, motor skills, postural balance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Physical Therapy
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Cerebral Palsy
Postural Balance
Motor Skills
Growth and Development
Cognition
Learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Sitting postural control affects the development of focused attention in children with cerebral palsy. / Surkar, Swati M.; Edelbrock, Christina; Stergiou, Nicholas; Berger, Sarah; Harbourne, Regina.

In: Pediatric Physical Therapy, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 16-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Surkar, Swati M. ; Edelbrock, Christina ; Stergiou, Nicholas ; Berger, Sarah ; Harbourne, Regina. / Sitting postural control affects the development of focused attention in children with cerebral palsy. In: Pediatric Physical Therapy. 2015 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 16-22.
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