Sight-reading versus repertoire performance on the piano: A case study using high-speed motion analysis

Brenda Wristen, Sharon Evans, Nicholas Stergiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was intended to examine whether differences exist in the motions employed by pianists when they are sight-reading versus performing repertoire and to determine whether these differences can be quantified using high-speed motion capture technology. A secondary question of interest was whether or not an improvement in the efficiency of motion could be observed between two sight-reading trials of the same musical excerpt. This case study employed one subject and a six-camera digital infrared camera system to capture the motion of the pianist playing two trials of a repertoire piece and two trials of a sight-reading excerpt. Angular displacements and velocities were calculated for bilateral shoulder, elbow, wrist, and index finger joints. The findings demonstrate the usefulness of high-speed motion capture technology for analyzing motions of pianists during performance, showing that the subject's motions were less efficient in sight-reading tasks than is repertoire tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10-16
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Problems of Performing Artists
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

Fingerprint

Reading
Finger Joint
Technology
Elbow
Repertoire
High Speed
Wrist
Pianists
Motion Capture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Sight-reading versus repertoire performance on the piano : A case study using high-speed motion analysis. / Wristen, Brenda; Evans, Sharon; Stergiou, Nicholas.

In: Medical Problems of Performing Artists, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.03.2006, p. 10-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7833abf59c44441db7aeb802c6e67aad,
title = "Sight-reading versus repertoire performance on the piano: A case study using high-speed motion analysis",
abstract = "This study was intended to examine whether differences exist in the motions employed by pianists when they are sight-reading versus performing repertoire and to determine whether these differences can be quantified using high-speed motion capture technology. A secondary question of interest was whether or not an improvement in the efficiency of motion could be observed between two sight-reading trials of the same musical excerpt. This case study employed one subject and a six-camera digital infrared camera system to capture the motion of the pianist playing two trials of a repertoire piece and two trials of a sight-reading excerpt. Angular displacements and velocities were calculated for bilateral shoulder, elbow, wrist, and index finger joints. The findings demonstrate the usefulness of high-speed motion capture technology for analyzing motions of pianists during performance, showing that the subject's motions were less efficient in sight-reading tasks than is repertoire tasks.",
author = "Brenda Wristen and Sharon Evans and Nicholas Stergiou",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "10--16",
journal = "Medical Problems of Performing Artists",
issn = "0885-1158",
publisher = "Science and Medicine Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sight-reading versus repertoire performance on the piano

T2 - A case study using high-speed motion analysis

AU - Wristen, Brenda

AU - Evans, Sharon

AU - Stergiou, Nicholas

PY - 2006/3/1

Y1 - 2006/3/1

N2 - This study was intended to examine whether differences exist in the motions employed by pianists when they are sight-reading versus performing repertoire and to determine whether these differences can be quantified using high-speed motion capture technology. A secondary question of interest was whether or not an improvement in the efficiency of motion could be observed between two sight-reading trials of the same musical excerpt. This case study employed one subject and a six-camera digital infrared camera system to capture the motion of the pianist playing two trials of a repertoire piece and two trials of a sight-reading excerpt. Angular displacements and velocities were calculated for bilateral shoulder, elbow, wrist, and index finger joints. The findings demonstrate the usefulness of high-speed motion capture technology for analyzing motions of pianists during performance, showing that the subject's motions were less efficient in sight-reading tasks than is repertoire tasks.

AB - This study was intended to examine whether differences exist in the motions employed by pianists when they are sight-reading versus performing repertoire and to determine whether these differences can be quantified using high-speed motion capture technology. A secondary question of interest was whether or not an improvement in the efficiency of motion could be observed between two sight-reading trials of the same musical excerpt. This case study employed one subject and a six-camera digital infrared camera system to capture the motion of the pianist playing two trials of a repertoire piece and two trials of a sight-reading excerpt. Angular displacements and velocities were calculated for bilateral shoulder, elbow, wrist, and index finger joints. The findings demonstrate the usefulness of high-speed motion capture technology for analyzing motions of pianists during performance, showing that the subject's motions were less efficient in sight-reading tasks than is repertoire tasks.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645067901&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645067901&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33645067901

VL - 21

SP - 10

EP - 16

JO - Medical Problems of Performing Artists

JF - Medical Problems of Performing Artists

SN - 0885-1158

IS - 1

ER -