Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Student Field Research Experiences in Special Populations

Amr S. Soliman, Robert M. Chamberlain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Global health education and training of biomedical students in international and minority health research is expending through U.S. academic institutions. This study addresses the short- and long-term outcomes of an NCI-funded R25 short-term summer field research training program. This program is designed for MPH and Ph.D. students in cancer epidemiology and related disciplines, in international and minority settings (special populations) in a recent 7-year period. Positive short-term outcome of 73 students was measured as publishing a manuscript from the field research data and having a job in special populations. Positive long-term outcome was measured as having a post-doc position, being in a doctoral program, and/or employment in special populations at least 3 years from finishing the program. Significant factors associated with both short- and long-term success included resourcefulness of the student and compatibility of personalities and interests between the student and the on-campus and off-campus mentors. Short-term-success of students who conducted international filed research was associated with visits of the on-campus mentor to the field site. Short-term success was also associated with extent of mentorship in the field site and with long-term success. Future studies should investigate how field research sites could enhance careers of students, appropriateness of the sites for specific training competencies, and how to maximize the learning experience of students in international and minority research sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 14 2015

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Students
Research
Population
Mentors
Minority Health
Manuscripts
Health Education
Personality
Epidemiology
Learning
Education
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Educational outcomes
  • Evaluation
  • International epidemiology
  • Research training
  • Special populations
  • Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology

Cite this

Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Student Field Research Experiences in Special Populations. / Soliman, Amr S.; Chamberlain, Robert M.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, 14.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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