Shared mechanisms among probiotic taxa: implications for general probiotic claims

Mary Ellen Sanders, Andrew Benson, Sarah Lebeer, Daniel J. Merenstein, Todd R. Klaenhammer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Strain-specificity of probiotic effects has been a cornerstone principle of probiotic science for decades. Certainly, some important mechanisms are present in only a few probiotic strains. But scientific advances now reveal commonalities among members of certain taxonomic groups of probiotic microbes. Some clinical benefits likely derive from these shared mechanisms, suggesting that sub-species-specific, species-specific or genus-specific probiotic effects exist. Human trials are necessary to confirm specific health benefits. However, a strain that has not been tested in human efficacy trials may meet the minimum definition of the term ‘probiotic’ if it is a member of a well-studied probiotic species expressing underlying core mechanisms and it is delivered at an effective dose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-216
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Biotechnology
Volume49
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

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Probiotics
Insurance Benefits
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Shared mechanisms among probiotic taxa : implications for general probiotic claims. / Sanders, Mary Ellen; Benson, Andrew; Lebeer, Sarah; Merenstein, Daniel J.; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology, Vol. 49, 02.2018, p. 207-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Sanders, Mary Ellen ; Benson, Andrew ; Lebeer, Sarah ; Merenstein, Daniel J. ; Klaenhammer, Todd R. / Shared mechanisms among probiotic taxa : implications for general probiotic claims. In: Current Opinion in Biotechnology. 2018 ; Vol. 49. pp. 207-216.
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