Sex modifies placental gene expression in response to metabolic and inflammatory stress

Theresa L. Barke, Kelli M. Money, Liping Du, Ana Serezani, Maureen Gannon, Karoly Mirnics, David M. Aronoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Metabolic stress (e.g., gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and obesity) and infections are common during pregnancy, impacting fetal development and the health of offspring. Such antenatal stresses can differentially impact male and female offspring. We sought to determine how metabolic stress and maternal immune activation (MIA), either alone or in combination, alters inflammatory gene expression within the placenta and whether the effects exhibited sexual dimorphism. Methods: Female C57BL/6 J mice were fed a normal diet or a high fat diet for 6 weeks prior to mating, with the latter diet inducing a GDM phenotype during pregnancy. Dams within each diet group at gestational day (GD) 12.5 received either an intraperitoneal injection of the viral mimic, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) or saline. Three hours post injection; placentae were collected and analyzed for changes in the expression of 248 unique immune genes. Results: Placental immune gene expression was significantly altered by GDM, MIA and the combination of the two (GDM+MIA). mRNA expression was generally lower in placentae of mice exposed to GDM alone compared with the other experimental groups, while mice exposed to MIA exhibited the highest transcript levels. Notably, fetal/placental sex influenced the responses of many immune genes to both metabolic and inflammatory stress. Discussion: GDM and MIA provoke inflammatory responses within the placenta and such effects exhibit sexual dimorphism. The combination of these stressors impacts the placenta differently than either condition alone. These findings may help explain sexual dimorphism observed in adverse pregnancy outcomes in human offspring exposed to similar stressors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPlacenta
Volume78
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Gestational Diabetes
Placenta
Gene Expression
Mothers
Sex Characteristics
Physiological Stress
Diet
Surrogate Mothers
Poly I-C
Pregnancy
High Fat Diet
Pregnancy Outcome
Fetal Development
Intraperitoneal Injections
Genes
Obesity
Phenotype
Messenger RNA
Injections
Health

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Fetal origins
  • Immunology
  • Infection
  • Maternal-child health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Sex modifies placental gene expression in response to metabolic and inflammatory stress. / Barke, Theresa L.; Money, Kelli M.; Du, Liping; Serezani, Ana; Gannon, Maureen; Mirnics, Karoly; Aronoff, David M.

In: Placenta, Vol. 78, 03.2019, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barke, Theresa L. ; Money, Kelli M. ; Du, Liping ; Serezani, Ana ; Gannon, Maureen ; Mirnics, Karoly ; Aronoff, David M. / Sex modifies placental gene expression in response to metabolic and inflammatory stress. In: Placenta. 2019 ; Vol. 78. pp. 1-9.
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