Sex differences in high fat-induced obesity in rats

Effects of 18-methoxycoronaridine

Olha Taraschenko, Isabelle M. Maisonneuve, Stanley D. Glick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence suggests that the development of diet-induced obesity in males and females might be mediated by distinct mechanisms, warranting different treatment approaches. In previous studies from this laboratory, a high sucrose diet induced excessive weight gain in female but not in male Sprague-Dawley rats, while weight gain in both sexes was similarly attenuated by the administration of a selective antagonist of α3β4 nicotinic receptors, 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC). In the present study, assessment of high-fat induced weight gain, consummatory behavior and biochemical markers of obesity was conducted in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and the effects of 18-MC treatment were compared in the two sexes. Male rats consuming a high-fat (HF) diet developed excessive weight gain and fat deposition compared to same same-sex controls fed with a low-fat (LF) diet. The development of obesity in these rats was attenuated by repeated administration of 18-MC (20. mg/kg, i.p.), which significantly reduced their food intake without altering water intake. In contrast, female rats consuming a HF diet did not become obese and did not respond to 18-MC treatment. These results show that males and females are differentially responsive to HF-induced obesity; the 18-MC data suggest that α3β4 nicotinic receptors may participate in maintaining obesity, possibly becoming a new and important target for anti-obesity agents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)308-314
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume103
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

Fingerprint

Sex Characteristics
Obesity
Fats
Weight Gain
Nicotinic Receptors
High Fat Diet
Sprague Dawley Rats
Consummatory Behavior
Anti-Obesity Agents
Diet
Fat-Restricted Diet
Drinking
Sucrose
Therapeutics
Eating
Biomarkers
18-methoxycoronaridine

Keywords

  • High fat diet
  • Nicotinic antagonists
  • Nicotinic receptors
  • Weight gain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Sex differences in high fat-induced obesity in rats : Effects of 18-methoxycoronaridine. / Taraschenko, Olha; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M.; Glick, Stanley D.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 103, No. 3-4, 01.06.2011, p. 308-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taraschenko, Olha ; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M. ; Glick, Stanley D. / Sex differences in high fat-induced obesity in rats : Effects of 18-methoxycoronaridine. In: Physiology and Behavior. 2011 ; Vol. 103, No. 3-4. pp. 308-314.
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