Serum lipids of physically active adults consuming omega-3 fatty acid-enriched eggs or conventional eggs

Carrie A. Sindelar, Sarah B. Scheerger, Sheri L. Plugge, Kent M. Eskridge, Rosemary C. Wander, Nancy M. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to compare the effects of the consumption of one omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched egg or one conventional egg on serum lipids in physically active adults. A total of 12 adults (mean age 33 ± 7 years, mean body mass index [BMI] 24 ± 3) were recruited, and dietary treatments were randomly assigned. After a 2-week lead-in period (baseline), participants received each 4-week treatment in a crossover arrangement with a 4-week washout period between treatments. Participants completed a 3-day food record at baseline and during each treatment period. Food records were analyzed for carbohydrates, protein, total fat, saturated fat, monounsaturated fatty acids, PUFA, n-3 PUFA, and cholesterol using the Food Processor Nutrition and Fitness (ESHA) software. Blood samples were collected at the end of each treatment period and analyzed for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and n-3 PUFA. Dietary intake of α-linolenic acid (1.196 ± 0.116 g·day-1) and docosahexaenoic acid (0.087 ± 0.013 g·day-1) and serum α-linolenic acid (10.52 ± 0.581 ng·mL-1) were higher during the n-3 PUFA-enriched egg treatment than during the conventional egg treatment (P< 0.05). Serum triglycerides were higher (P< 0.05) with n-3 PUFA-enriched eggs (86.54 ± 5.84 mg·dL-1) than with conventional eggs (67.56 ± 5.48 mg·dL-1). Daily consumption of one n-3 PUFA-enriched egg resulted in higher serum α-linolenic acid and triglycerides in physically active adults than did daily consumption of one conventional egg.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)731-739
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition Research
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2004

Fingerprint

Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Eggs
Ovum
Lipids
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Serum
Triglycerides
Food
Fats
Cholesterol
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Body Mass Index
Software
Carbohydrates
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cholesterol
  • Docohexaenoic acid
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids
  • Runners
  • Triglycerides
  • α-Linolenic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Serum lipids of physically active adults consuming omega-3 fatty acid-enriched eggs or conventional eggs. / Sindelar, Carrie A.; Scheerger, Sarah B.; Plugge, Sheri L.; Eskridge, Kent M.; Wander, Rosemary C.; Lewis, Nancy M.

In: Nutrition Research, Vol. 24, No. 9, 01.09.2004, p. 731-739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sindelar, Carrie A. ; Scheerger, Sarah B. ; Plugge, Sheri L. ; Eskridge, Kent M. ; Wander, Rosemary C. ; Lewis, Nancy M. / Serum lipids of physically active adults consuming omega-3 fatty acid-enriched eggs or conventional eggs. In: Nutrition Research. 2004 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 731-739.
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