Self-efficacy for management of symptoms and symptom distress in adults with cancer: An integrative review

Lynn L. White, Marlene Z. Cohen, Ann Malone Berger, Kevin A Kupzyk, Philip Jay Bierman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION: Self-efficacy for symptom management plays a key role in outcomes, such as quality of life (QOL), functional status, and symptom distress, for adults with cancer. This integrative review identified and assessed evidence regarding self-efficacy for management of symptoms and symptom distress in adults with cancer. LITERATURE SEARCH: The authors performed a search of literature published from 2006-2018, and articles that examined the relationship among self-reported self-efficacy, symptom management, symptom distress or frequency, and severity in adults with cancer were selected for inclusion. DATA EVALUATION: 22 articles met the inclusion criteria. All articles were critically appraised and met standards for methodologic quality. SYNTHESIS: Evidence from this review showed that high self-efficacy was associated with low symptom occurrence and symptom distress and higher general health and QOL. High self-efficacy predicted physical and emotional well-being. Low self-efficacy was associated with higher symptom severity, poorer outcomes, and better overall functioning. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: Self-efficacy can be assessed using developed instruments. Presence of a theoretical model and validated instruments to measure self-efficacy for symptom management have set the groundwork for ongoing research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-128
Number of pages16
JournalOncology nursing forum
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

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Self Efficacy
Self Care
Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Theoretical Models
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Integrative review
  • Self-efficacy
  • Symptom distress
  • Symptom management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Self-efficacy for management of symptoms and symptom distress in adults with cancer : An integrative review. / White, Lynn L.; Cohen, Marlene Z.; Berger, Ann Malone; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Bierman, Philip Jay.

In: Oncology nursing forum, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 113-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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