Selective transmission of R5-tropic HIV type 1 from dendritic cells to resting CD4+ T cells

S. A. David, M. S. Smith, G. J. Lopez, I. Adany, S. Mukherjee, S. Buch, M. M. Goodenow, O. Narayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an in vitro coculture model of monocyte-derived, cultured human dendritic cells (DC) with autologous CD4+ resting T cells, CCR5 (R5)-tropic strains of HIV-1, but not CXCR4 (X4)-tropic strains, were transmitted to resting CD4+ T cells, leading to prolific viral output, although DC were susceptible to infection with either strain. Macrophages, which were also infectable with either R5- or X4-tropic strains, did not transmit infection to CD4+ cells. Highly productive HIV infection in this model appeared to be a consequence of heterokaryotic syncytium formation between infected DC and T cells since syncytia formation developed only in R5-infected DC/CD4+ cocultures. These results suggested that the unique microenvironment derived from the fusion between the infected DC and CD4+ cell was highly permissive and selective for replication of R5-tropic viruses. The apparent selectivity for R5-tropic strains in such syncytia was attributable neither to differential DC-mediated activation nor to selective modulation of induction of α- or β-chemokines in the infected DC. This model of HIV replication may provide useful insights into in vitro correlates of HIV pathogenicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-68
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Dendritic Cells
HIV-1
T-Lymphocytes
Giant Cells
Coculture Techniques
HIV
Infection
Chemokines
HIV Infections
Virulence
Monocytes
Macrophages
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Selective transmission of R5-tropic HIV type 1 from dendritic cells to resting CD4+ T cells. / David, S. A.; Smith, M. S.; Lopez, G. J.; Adany, I.; Mukherjee, S.; Buch, S.; Goodenow, M. M.; Narayan, O.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 59-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

David, SA, Smith, MS, Lopez, GJ, Adany, I, Mukherjee, S, Buch, S, Goodenow, MM & Narayan, O 2001, 'Selective transmission of R5-tropic HIV type 1 from dendritic cells to resting CD4+ T cells', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 59-68. https://doi.org/10.1089/088922201750056799
David, S. A. ; Smith, M. S. ; Lopez, G. J. ; Adany, I. ; Mukherjee, S. ; Buch, S. ; Goodenow, M. M. ; Narayan, O. / Selective transmission of R5-tropic HIV type 1 from dendritic cells to resting CD4+ T cells. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2001 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 59-68.
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