Selective loss of suppressor cell function in New Zealand mice induced by NTA

L. W. Klassen, R. S. Krakauer, A. D. Steinberg

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Abstract

New Zealand mice develop a naturally occurring thymocytotoxic antibody (NTA) which increases in titer with age. This antibody causes a loss of recirculating peripheral T cells and interferes with T cell functions. To study the potential pathogenic role of NTA in murine autoimmune disease, NZB/W mice were injected daily with NTA-containing serum starting at 3 to 5 days of age. Littermate controls received normal mouse serum (NMS). After 4.5 weeks of treatment, spleen cells from female NZB/W mice treated with NTA had a significant increase in capacity to induce graft-vs-host disease in newborn Swiss mice, suggesting a deficiency of suppressor cells. Con A-activated spleen cells from NMS-treated animals suppressed IgM synthesis in vitro; however, Con A-activated spleen cells from NTA-treated mice were not suppressive. The NTA-induced loss of suppressor cell function was prevented by prior absorption of the NTA with thymocytes. Cells from control (NMS-treated) and NTA-treated littermates responded similarly to mitogens (Con A, PHA, PWM, LPS) and allogeneic lymphocytes in vitro. Although the number of nucleated spleen cells and splenic B cells was not changed by NTA treatment, a moderate reduction of T cells was seen (37% to 26% Thy 1.2 positive cells). Nevertheless, NTA treatment did not alter either skin allograft injection or the antibody response to immunization with the T-dependent antigen SRBC. These studies suggest that NTA causes a selective loss of suppressor cells in NZB/W mice, supporting the hypothesis that NTA may play a pathogenic role in murine autoimmunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)830-837
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume119
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 1977

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New Zealand
Antibodies
Inbred NZB Mouse
Spleen
Serum
T-Lymphocytes
Viral Tumor Antigens
Graft vs Host Disease
Thymocytes
Autoimmunity
Mitogens
Autoimmune Diseases
Antibody Formation
Allografts
Immunoglobulin M
Immunization
B-Lymphocytes
Therapeutics
Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Selective loss of suppressor cell function in New Zealand mice induced by NTA. / Klassen, L. W.; Krakauer, R. S.; Steinberg, A. D.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 119, No. 3, 01.12.1977, p. 830-837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klassen, L. W. ; Krakauer, R. S. ; Steinberg, A. D. / Selective loss of suppressor cell function in New Zealand mice induced by NTA. In: Journal of Immunology. 1977 ; Vol. 119, No. 3. pp. 830-837.
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