Seismic investigation for the Temple of Antioch reconstruction

Ece Erdogmus, Terri Norton, Cody M. Buckley, Kyle Kauzlarich, Brad Petersen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Founded in the middle of the 1st century A.D., Antiocheia ad Cragum was one of the larger Roman cities of the Mediterranean coast region of modern Turkey. This coastal region of Anatolia was known as Rough Cilicia in antiquity. The ancient city, now in a state of ruin, includes an imperial Temple, which was first identified by archaeologists in the 1960s. In 2004, a new project started, with the goal of studying, excavating, and perhaps partially restoring the Temple to a state of "site museum". Several theories have been postulated regarding the collapse of the original temple. Since the temple is located near the East Anatolian Fault, it is highly probable that a seismic event aided in the collapse. In order to better understand the performance of the temple under seismic loading, virtual and physical models of the temple are being created. This paper provides an overview of the project and details the progress being made in seismic analysis. The first author is the architectural engineering director of this project that is conducted in collaboration with art historians and archaeologists, and under the observations and rules of the Turkish Ministry of Culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk
Subtitle of host publicationAnalysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences
Pages268-275
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 13 2011
EventInternational Conference on Vulnerability and Risk Analysis and Management, ICVRAM 2011 and the International Symposium on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis, ISUMA 2011 - Hyattsville, MD, United States
Duration: Apr 11 2011Apr 13 2011

Publication series

NameVulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences

Other

OtherInternational Conference on Vulnerability and Risk Analysis and Management, ICVRAM 2011 and the International Symposium on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis, ISUMA 2011
CountryUnited States
CityHyattsville, MD
Period4/11/114/13/11

Fingerprint

Museums
Coastal zones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

Cite this

Erdogmus, E., Norton, T., Buckley, C. M., Kauzlarich, K., & Petersen, B. (2011). Seismic investigation for the Temple of Antioch reconstruction. In Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences (pp. 268-275). (Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences). https://doi.org/10.1061/41170(400)33

Seismic investigation for the Temple of Antioch reconstruction. / Erdogmus, Ece; Norton, Terri; Buckley, Cody M.; Kauzlarich, Kyle; Petersen, Brad.

Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences. 2011. p. 268-275 (Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Erdogmus, E, Norton, T, Buckley, CM, Kauzlarich, K & Petersen, B 2011, Seismic investigation for the Temple of Antioch reconstruction. in Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences. Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences, pp. 268-275, International Conference on Vulnerability and Risk Analysis and Management, ICVRAM 2011 and the International Symposium on Uncertainty Modeling and Analysis, ISUMA 2011, Hyattsville, MD, United States, 4/11/11. https://doi.org/10.1061/41170(400)33
Erdogmus E, Norton T, Buckley CM, Kauzlarich K, Petersen B. Seismic investigation for the Temple of Antioch reconstruction. In Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences. 2011. p. 268-275. (Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences). https://doi.org/10.1061/41170(400)33
Erdogmus, Ece ; Norton, Terri ; Buckley, Cody M. ; Kauzlarich, Kyle ; Petersen, Brad. / Seismic investigation for the Temple of Antioch reconstruction. Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences. 2011. pp. 268-275 (Vulnerability, Uncertainty, and Risk: Analysis, Modeling, and Management - Proceedings of the ICVRAM 2011 and ISUMA 2011 Conferences).
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