Second-side surgery in superior canal dehiscence syndrome

Yuri Agrawal, Lloyd B. Minor, Michael C. Schubert, Kristen L Janky, Marcela Davalos-Bichara, John P. Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Bilateral superior canal (SC) dehiscence syndrome poses a challenge because bilateral SC dehiscence (SCD) plugging might be expected to result in oscillopsia and disability. Our aims were as follows: 1) to evaluate which symptoms prompted patients with bilateral SCD syndrome (SCDS) to seek second-side surgery, and 2) to determine the prevalence of disabling imbalance and oscillopsia after bilateral SC plugging. Study Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: Five patients with bilateral SCDS based on history, audiometric and physiologic testing, and computed tomographic findings. This includes all of our patients who have had second-side plugging surgery to date. Intervention(s): Bilateral sequential middle fossa craniotomy and plugging of SCs. Main Outcome Measure(s): Cochleovestibular symptoms, cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential testing, dizziness handicap inventory, short-form 36 Health Survey, dynamic visual acuity testing. Results: The most common symptoms prompting second-side surgery were sound- and pressure-induced vertigo and autophony. Three of the 5 patients reported that symptoms shifted to the contralateral ear immediately after plugging the first side, whereas in 2 patients, contralateral symptoms developed several years after the first SC plugging. Two of 4 patients experienced ongoing oscillopsia after bilateral SCDS surgery; however, all patients reported relief from their SCD symptoms and were glad that they had pursued bilateral surgery. Conclusion: In patients with bilateral SCDS, sound- and pressure-induced vertigo most commonly prompted second-side surgery. Despite some degree of oscillopsia after bilateral SCDS surgery, patients were very satisfied with second-side surgery, given their relief from other SCDS symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-77
Number of pages6
JournalOtology and Neurotology
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials
Vertigo
Pressure
Craniotomy
Dizziness
Health Surveys
Tertiary Care Centers
Visual Acuity
Observational Studies
Ear
History
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Bilateral
  • Quality of life
  • Superior canal dehiscence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Agrawal, Y., Minor, L. B., Schubert, M. C., Janky, K. L., Davalos-Bichara, M., & Carey, J. P. (2012). Second-side surgery in superior canal dehiscence syndrome. Otology and Neurotology, 33(1), 72-77. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31823c9182

Second-side surgery in superior canal dehiscence syndrome. / Agrawal, Yuri; Minor, Lloyd B.; Schubert, Michael C.; Janky, Kristen L; Davalos-Bichara, Marcela; Carey, John P.

In: Otology and Neurotology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 72-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agrawal, Y, Minor, LB, Schubert, MC, Janky, KL, Davalos-Bichara, M & Carey, JP 2012, 'Second-side surgery in superior canal dehiscence syndrome', Otology and Neurotology, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 72-77. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31823c9182
Agrawal Y, Minor LB, Schubert MC, Janky KL, Davalos-Bichara M, Carey JP. Second-side surgery in superior canal dehiscence syndrome. Otology and Neurotology. 2012 Jan 1;33(1):72-77. https://doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31823c9182
Agrawal, Yuri ; Minor, Lloyd B. ; Schubert, Michael C. ; Janky, Kristen L ; Davalos-Bichara, Marcela ; Carey, John P. / Second-side surgery in superior canal dehiscence syndrome. In: Otology and Neurotology. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 72-77.
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