School racial composition and race/ethnic differences in early adulthood health

Bridget J Goosby, Katrina M. Walsemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate whether school racial composition is associated with racial and ethnic differences in early adult health. We then examine whether perceived discrimination, social connectedness, and parent support attenuates this relationship. Using U.S. data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, we found that black adolescents attending predominantly white schools reported poorer adult health while Asians reported better health. Further research is warranted to understand whether there are qualitative differences in the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities within certain school contexts and how that differential treatment is related to adult health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-304
Number of pages9
JournalHealth and Place
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

adulthood
Health
health
school
social discrimination
adolescent
ethnic minority
Longitudinal Studies
national minority
parents
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Disparities
  • Race/ethnicity
  • School segregation
  • Social integration
  • Social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

School racial composition and race/ethnic differences in early adulthood health. / Goosby, Bridget J; Walsemann, Katrina M.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.01.2012, p. 296-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9304d5b7bd8b4261992fac5d78abaf17,
title = "School racial composition and race/ethnic differences in early adulthood health",
abstract = "We investigate whether school racial composition is associated with racial and ethnic differences in early adult health. We then examine whether perceived discrimination, social connectedness, and parent support attenuates this relationship. Using U.S. data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, we found that black adolescents attending predominantly white schools reported poorer adult health while Asians reported better health. Further research is warranted to understand whether there are qualitative differences in the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities within certain school contexts and how that differential treatment is related to adult health outcomes.",
keywords = "Discrimination, Disparities, Race/ethnicity, School segregation, Social integration, Social support",
author = "Goosby, {Bridget J} and Walsemann, {Katrina M.}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.healthplace.2011.10.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "296--304",
journal = "Health and Place",
issn = "1353-8292",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - School racial composition and race/ethnic differences in early adulthood health

AU - Goosby, Bridget J

AU - Walsemann, Katrina M.

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - We investigate whether school racial composition is associated with racial and ethnic differences in early adult health. We then examine whether perceived discrimination, social connectedness, and parent support attenuates this relationship. Using U.S. data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, we found that black adolescents attending predominantly white schools reported poorer adult health while Asians reported better health. Further research is warranted to understand whether there are qualitative differences in the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities within certain school contexts and how that differential treatment is related to adult health outcomes.

AB - We investigate whether school racial composition is associated with racial and ethnic differences in early adult health. We then examine whether perceived discrimination, social connectedness, and parent support attenuates this relationship. Using U.S. data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health, we found that black adolescents attending predominantly white schools reported poorer adult health while Asians reported better health. Further research is warranted to understand whether there are qualitative differences in the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities within certain school contexts and how that differential treatment is related to adult health outcomes.

KW - Discrimination

KW - Disparities

KW - Race/ethnicity

KW - School segregation

KW - Social integration

KW - Social support

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84856577926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84856577926&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2011.10.002

DO - 10.1016/j.healthplace.2011.10.002

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 296

EP - 304

JO - Health and Place

JF - Health and Place

SN - 1353-8292

IS - 2

ER -