School Health Services

What Costs? What Benefits?

Ian M Newman, Gary L. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data describing the utilization of school health services in a small rural elementary school were examined in terms of the costs of these services and the contributions of these to the school's educational mission. In the absence of health service personnel, teacher time needed to care for routine and emergency health services would equal almost one half of a teacher's time. When costs of health services wer compared to the value of the services provided by a health aide and part‐time nurse, it was clear that health service costs were minimal compared to the contributions made to the school's educational mission. 1981 American School Health Association

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-427
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of School Health
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981

Fingerprint

School Health Services
Health Services
health service
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
Nurses' Aides
school
Emergency Medical Services
Health Personnel
Health Care Costs
rural school
teacher
health
Health
elementary school
personnel
nurse
utilization
Costs
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Philosophy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

School Health Services : What Costs? What Benefits? / Newman, Ian M; Martin, Gary L.

In: Journal of School Health, Vol. 51, No. 6, 01.01.1981, p. 423-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Newman, Ian M ; Martin, Gary L. / School Health Services : What Costs? What Benefits?. In: Journal of School Health. 1981 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 423-427.
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