Scapholunate Advanced Collapse

Four-Corner Fusion and Proximal Row Carpectomy

Ryan Miller, Philipp N Streubel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In athletes, scapholunate injuries may be misdiagnosed as wrist sprains which over time almost invariably lead to scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) of the wrist. In this setting, arthritic changes progress from the radioscaphoid joint to the lunocapitate interval, usually preserving the radiolunate articulation. Treatment options for SLAC range from nonoperative alternatives to wrist denervation, limited intercarpal fusions, proximal row carpectomy, and total wrist fusion. This article describes four-corner fusion and proximal row carpectomy as 2 widely used and successful options for the management of SLAC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number50544
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalOperative Techniques in Sports Medicine
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Wrist
Sprains and Strains
Denervation
Diagnostic Errors
Athletes
Arthritis
Joints
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Scapholunate ligament
  • Wrist arthritis
  • Wrist fusion
  • Wrist injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Scapholunate Advanced Collapse : Four-Corner Fusion and Proximal Row Carpectomy. / Miller, Ryan; Streubel, Philipp N.

In: Operative Techniques in Sports Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 2, 50544, 01.06.2016, p. 117-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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