Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Sesame Seed in Foods

Stef J. Koppelman, Gülsen Söylemez, Lynn Niemann, Ferdelie E. Gaskin, Joseph L. Baumert, Steve L. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small amounts of sesame can trigger allergic reactions in sesame-allergic patients. Because sesame is a widely used food ingredient, analytical methods are needed to support quality control and food safety programs in the food industry. In this study, polyclonal antibodies against sesame seed proteins were raised, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection and quantification of sesame seed residue in food. A comparison was made between this ELISA and other assays, particularly focusing on recovery of sesame seed residue from different food matrices. The developed ELISA is sensitive with a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 ppm and shows essentially no cross-reactivity with other foods or food ingredients (92 tested). The ELISA has a good recovery for analyzing sesame-based tahini in peanut butter, outperforming one other test. In a baked bread matrix, the ELISA has a low recovery, while two other assays perform better. We conclude that a sensitive and specific ELISA can be constructed based on polyclonal antibodies, which is suitable for detection of small amounts of sesame seed relevant for highly allergic patients. Furthermore, we conclude that different food products may require different assays to ensure adequate quantification of sesame.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number853836
JournalBioMed research international
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Sesamum
Immunosorbents
Seed
Assays
Seeds
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food
Enzymes
Recovery
Food safety
Butter
Antibodies
Food Safety
Food Industry
Bread
Quality Control
Quality control
Hypersensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Sesame Seed in Foods. / Koppelman, Stef J.; Söylemez, Gülsen; Niemann, Lynn; Gaskin, Ferdelie E.; Baumert, Joseph L.; Taylor, Steve L.

In: BioMed research international, Vol. 2015, 853836, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koppelman, Stef J. ; Söylemez, Gülsen ; Niemann, Lynn ; Gaskin, Ferdelie E. ; Baumert, Joseph L. ; Taylor, Steve L. / Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Sesame Seed in Foods. In: BioMed research international. 2015 ; Vol. 2015.
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