Safety and sustainability of monolithic dome structures in hurricane prone regions

K. R. Grosskopf, J. Sullivan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

"Monolithic dome" is a type of continuous thin shell concrete structure created using an inflated form, reinforcing steel and spray-applied concrete. Designed to withstand pressures exceeding 19 kPa (400lbs/ft 2), or roughly the force of a 490 km/h (300 m/h) wind, the monolithic dome is considered immune from the effects of hurricanes and other natural disasters. Combined with polyurethane foam, monolithic domes use 50% of the energy of comparable U.S. masonry homes. The inorganic, non-combustible and impermeable properties of monolithic dome construction reduce the risk of fire, mold, decay and insect infestation. At roughly $US 1,075/m2 ($US 100/ft2), monolithic domes are 30-40% more expensive than comparable masonry or wood frame residential units. The following research compares the disaster resistance, energy performance, materials use, and cost of monolithic dome structures built in the hurricane prone state of Florida to conventional wood frame and masonry construction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction
Pages1199-1204
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Nov 12 2008
Event4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction - Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Duration: Sep 26 2007Sep 28 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction
Volume2

Other

Other4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne, VIC
Period9/26/079/28/07

Fingerprint

Hurricanes
Domes
Sustainable development
Disasters
Wood
Masonry construction
Forms (concrete)
Concrete construction
Polyurethanes
Foams
Fires
Concretes
Steel
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Grosskopf, K. R., & Sullivan, J. (2008). Safety and sustainability of monolithic dome structures in hurricane prone regions. In Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction (pp. 1199-1204). (Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction; Vol. 2).

Safety and sustainability of monolithic dome structures in hurricane prone regions. / Grosskopf, K. R.; Sullivan, J.

Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction. 2008. p. 1199-1204 (Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Grosskopf, KR & Sullivan, J 2008, Safety and sustainability of monolithic dome structures in hurricane prone regions. in Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction. Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction, vol. 2, pp. 1199-1204, 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction, Melbourne, VIC, Australia, 9/26/07.
Grosskopf KR, Sullivan J. Safety and sustainability of monolithic dome structures in hurricane prone regions. In Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction. 2008. p. 1199-1204. (Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction).
Grosskopf, K. R. ; Sullivan, J. / Safety and sustainability of monolithic dome structures in hurricane prone regions. Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction. 2008. pp. 1199-1204 (Proceedings of the 4th International Structural Engineering and Construction Conference, ISEC-4 - Innovations in Structural Engineering and Construction).
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