S-glutathionylation enhances human cystathionine β-synthase activity under oxidative stress conditions

Wei Ning Niu, Pramod Kumar Yadav, Jiri Adamec, Ruma Banerjee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the two-step trans-sulfuration pathway that converts homocysteine to cysteine. It is also one of three major enzymes responsible for the biogenesis of H2S, a signaling molecule. We have previously demonstrated that CBS is activated in cells challenged by oxidative stress, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this regulation has remained unclear. Results: Here, we demonstrate that S-glutathionylation of CBS enhances its activity ∼2-fold in vitro. Loss of this post-translational modification in the presence of dithiothreitol results in reversal to basal activity. Cys346 was identified as the site for S-glutathionylation by a combination of mass spectrometric, mutagenesis, and activity analyses. To test the physiological relevance of S-glutathionylation-dependent regulation of CBS, HEK293 cells were oxidatively challenged with peroxide, which is known to enhance the trans-sulfuration flux. Under these conditions, CBS glutathionylation levels increased and were correlated with a ∼3-fold increase in CBS activity. Innovation: Collectively, our results reveal a novel post-translational modification of CBS, that is, glutathionylation, which functions as an allosteric activator under oxidative stress conditions permitting enhanced synthesis of both cysteine and H2S. Conclusions: Our study elucidates a molecular mechanism for increased cysteine and therefore glutathione, synthesis via glutathionylation of CBS. They also demonstrate the potential for increased H2S production under oxidative stress conditions, particularly in tissues where CBS is a major source of H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 350-361.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-361
Number of pages12
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2015

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Cystathionine
Oxidative stress
Cysteine
Oxidative Stress
Post Translational Protein Processing
Mutagenesis
HEK293 Cells
Dithiothreitol
Peroxides
Homocysteine
Oxidation-Reduction
Glutathione
Innovation
Tissue
Fluxes
Molecules
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

S-glutathionylation enhances human cystathionine β-synthase activity under oxidative stress conditions. / Niu, Wei Ning; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Adamec, Jiri; Banerjee, Ruma.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 22, No. 5, 10.02.2015, p. 350-361.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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