Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet

S. C. Fernando, H. T. Purvis, F. Z. Najar, L. O. Sukharnikov, C. R. Krehbiel, T. G. Nagaraja, B. A. Roe, U. De Silva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

288 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High-grain adaptation programs are widely used with feedlot cattle to balance enhanced growth performance against the risk of acidosis. This adaptation to a high-grain diet from a high-forage diet is known to change the rumen microbial population structure and help establish a stable microbial population within the rumen. Therefore, to evaluate bacterial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet, 4 ruminally cannulated beef steers were adapted to a high-grain diet using a step-up diet regimen containing grain and hay at ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20. The rumen bacterial populations were evaluated at each stage of the step-up diet after 1 week of adaptation, before the steers were transitioned to the next stage of the diet, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, 16S rRNA gene libraries, and quantitative real-time PCR. The T-RFLP analysis displayed a shift in the rumen microbial population structure during the final two stages of the step-up diet. The 16S rRNA gene libraries demonstrated two distinct rumen microbial populations in hay-fed and high-grain-fed animals and detected only 24 common operational taxonomic units out of 398 and 315, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene libraries of hay-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Fibrobacteres, whereas the 16S rRNA gene libraries of grain-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Real-time PCR analysis detected significant fold increases in the Megasphaera elsdenii, Streptococcus bovis, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Prevotella bryantii populations during adaptation to the highconcentrate (high-grain) diet, whereas the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Fibrobacter succinogenes populations gradually decreased as the animals were adapted to the high-concentrate diet. This study evaluates the rumen microbial population using several molecular approaches and presents a broader picture of the rumen microbial population structure during adaptation to a high-grain diet from a forage diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7482-7490
Number of pages9
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume76
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

Fingerprint

Rumen
Population Dynamics
rumen
population dynamics
diet
Diet
RNA libraries
Gene Library
rRNA Genes
Population
hay
population structure
feed grains
gene
animal
Fibrobacteres
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Prevotella bryantii
forage
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Fernando, S. C., Purvis, H. T., Najar, F. Z., Sukharnikov, L. O., Krehbiel, C. R., Nagaraja, T. G., ... De Silva, U. (2010). Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet. Applied and environmental microbiology, 76(22), 7482-7490. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00388-10

Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet. / Fernando, S. C.; Purvis, H. T.; Najar, F. Z.; Sukharnikov, L. O.; Krehbiel, C. R.; Nagaraja, T. G.; Roe, B. A.; De Silva, U.

In: Applied and environmental microbiology, Vol. 76, No. 22, 01.11.2010, p. 7482-7490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fernando, SC, Purvis, HT, Najar, FZ, Sukharnikov, LO, Krehbiel, CR, Nagaraja, TG, Roe, BA & De Silva, U 2010, 'Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet', Applied and environmental microbiology, vol. 76, no. 22, pp. 7482-7490. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00388-10
Fernando, S. C. ; Purvis, H. T. ; Najar, F. Z. ; Sukharnikov, L. O. ; Krehbiel, C. R. ; Nagaraja, T. G. ; Roe, B. A. ; De Silva, U. / Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet. In: Applied and environmental microbiology. 2010 ; Vol. 76, No. 22. pp. 7482-7490.
@article{674813c412e34b84b5b1ec4a3fa7a55a,
title = "Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet",
abstract = "High-grain adaptation programs are widely used with feedlot cattle to balance enhanced growth performance against the risk of acidosis. This adaptation to a high-grain diet from a high-forage diet is known to change the rumen microbial population structure and help establish a stable microbial population within the rumen. Therefore, to evaluate bacterial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet, 4 ruminally cannulated beef steers were adapted to a high-grain diet using a step-up diet regimen containing grain and hay at ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20. The rumen bacterial populations were evaluated at each stage of the step-up diet after 1 week of adaptation, before the steers were transitioned to the next stage of the diet, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, 16S rRNA gene libraries, and quantitative real-time PCR. The T-RFLP analysis displayed a shift in the rumen microbial population structure during the final two stages of the step-up diet. The 16S rRNA gene libraries demonstrated two distinct rumen microbial populations in hay-fed and high-grain-fed animals and detected only 24 common operational taxonomic units out of 398 and 315, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene libraries of hay-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Fibrobacteres, whereas the 16S rRNA gene libraries of grain-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Real-time PCR analysis detected significant fold increases in the Megasphaera elsdenii, Streptococcus bovis, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Prevotella bryantii populations during adaptation to the highconcentrate (high-grain) diet, whereas the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Fibrobacter succinogenes populations gradually decreased as the animals were adapted to the high-concentrate diet. This study evaluates the rumen microbial population using several molecular approaches and presents a broader picture of the rumen microbial population structure during adaptation to a high-grain diet from a forage diet.",
author = "Fernando, {S. C.} and Purvis, {H. T.} and Najar, {F. Z.} and Sukharnikov, {L. O.} and Krehbiel, {C. R.} and Nagaraja, {T. G.} and Roe, {B. A.} and {De Silva}, U.",
year = "2010",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/AEM.00388-10",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "7482--7490",
journal = "Applied and Environmental Microbiology",
issn = "0099-2240",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "22",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rumen microbial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet

AU - Fernando, S. C.

AU - Purvis, H. T.

AU - Najar, F. Z.

AU - Sukharnikov, L. O.

AU - Krehbiel, C. R.

AU - Nagaraja, T. G.

AU - Roe, B. A.

AU - De Silva, U.

PY - 2010/11/1

Y1 - 2010/11/1

N2 - High-grain adaptation programs are widely used with feedlot cattle to balance enhanced growth performance against the risk of acidosis. This adaptation to a high-grain diet from a high-forage diet is known to change the rumen microbial population structure and help establish a stable microbial population within the rumen. Therefore, to evaluate bacterial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet, 4 ruminally cannulated beef steers were adapted to a high-grain diet using a step-up diet regimen containing grain and hay at ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20. The rumen bacterial populations were evaluated at each stage of the step-up diet after 1 week of adaptation, before the steers were transitioned to the next stage of the diet, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, 16S rRNA gene libraries, and quantitative real-time PCR. The T-RFLP analysis displayed a shift in the rumen microbial population structure during the final two stages of the step-up diet. The 16S rRNA gene libraries demonstrated two distinct rumen microbial populations in hay-fed and high-grain-fed animals and detected only 24 common operational taxonomic units out of 398 and 315, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene libraries of hay-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Fibrobacteres, whereas the 16S rRNA gene libraries of grain-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Real-time PCR analysis detected significant fold increases in the Megasphaera elsdenii, Streptococcus bovis, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Prevotella bryantii populations during adaptation to the highconcentrate (high-grain) diet, whereas the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Fibrobacter succinogenes populations gradually decreased as the animals were adapted to the high-concentrate diet. This study evaluates the rumen microbial population using several molecular approaches and presents a broader picture of the rumen microbial population structure during adaptation to a high-grain diet from a forage diet.

AB - High-grain adaptation programs are widely used with feedlot cattle to balance enhanced growth performance against the risk of acidosis. This adaptation to a high-grain diet from a high-forage diet is known to change the rumen microbial population structure and help establish a stable microbial population within the rumen. Therefore, to evaluate bacterial population dynamics during adaptation to a high-grain diet, 4 ruminally cannulated beef steers were adapted to a high-grain diet using a step-up diet regimen containing grain and hay at ratios of 20:80, 40:60, 60:40, and 80:20. The rumen bacterial populations were evaluated at each stage of the step-up diet after 1 week of adaptation, before the steers were transitioned to the next stage of the diet, using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, 16S rRNA gene libraries, and quantitative real-time PCR. The T-RFLP analysis displayed a shift in the rumen microbial population structure during the final two stages of the step-up diet. The 16S rRNA gene libraries demonstrated two distinct rumen microbial populations in hay-fed and high-grain-fed animals and detected only 24 common operational taxonomic units out of 398 and 315, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene libraries of hay-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Fibrobacteres, whereas the 16S rRNA gene libraries of grain-fed animals contained a significantly higher number of bacteria belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Real-time PCR analysis detected significant fold increases in the Megasphaera elsdenii, Streptococcus bovis, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Prevotella bryantii populations during adaptation to the highconcentrate (high-grain) diet, whereas the Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens and Fibrobacter succinogenes populations gradually decreased as the animals were adapted to the high-concentrate diet. This study evaluates the rumen microbial population using several molecular approaches and presents a broader picture of the rumen microbial population structure during adaptation to a high-grain diet from a forage diet.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649706430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649706430&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/AEM.00388-10

DO - 10.1128/AEM.00388-10

M3 - Article

C2 - 20851965

AN - SCOPUS:78649706430

VL - 76

SP - 7482

EP - 7490

JO - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

JF - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

SN - 0099-2240

IS - 22

ER -