Role of Renal Nerves and Vasopressin in Renal Responses to Acute Volume Expansion in Rats

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was to determine whether the presence or absence of renal nerves and vasopressin altered the diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute volume expansion. Two forms of volume expansion were used: (i) inflation of a small balloon in the veno-atrial junction and (ii) an infusion of isotonic saline at a rate of 1 ml/min for a period of 15 min, approximately 7% of body weight. Balloon inflation produced a significant diuresis from both the intact and denervated kidneys but only produced a significant natriuresis from the intact kidney. Volume expansion (infusion of saline) produced a significant diuresis and natriuresis from both intact and denervated kidneys. Blocking the V2 receptor for vasopressin with a V2-specific receptor blocker d(CH2)5[olle2,Val4]AVP (40 μg/kg bolus dose followed by infusion of 4 μg/kg/min) did not alter the diuretic and natriuretic responses to volume expansion. However, the absence of renal nerves or the absence of actions of vasopressin produced a significant reduction in the capacity of the kidneys to increase the relative amount of diuresis or natriuresis, thus losing the control over output; i.e., absence of renal nerves only allowed 12-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state and absence of vasopressin only allowed 4.6-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state. Examining the “volume reflex” in terms of a control system trying to regulate fluid balance, the presence of either renal nerves or actions of vasopressin allows the volume regulating system a greater range in which to control the diuresis and natriuresis (making it possible to fine tune the output to much greater extent).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-443
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume196
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1991

Fingerprint

Vasopressins
Rats
Diuresis
Kidney
Natriuresis
Balloons
Diuretics
Vasopressin Receptors
Economic Inflation
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Reflex
Control systems
Fluids
Body Weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

@article{7d0ada6695e14596a74b855ca6f25826,
title = "Role of Renal Nerves and Vasopressin in Renal Responses to Acute Volume Expansion in Rats",
abstract = "This study was to determine whether the presence or absence of renal nerves and vasopressin altered the diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute volume expansion. Two forms of volume expansion were used: (i) inflation of a small balloon in the veno-atrial junction and (ii) an infusion of isotonic saline at a rate of 1 ml/min for a period of 15 min, approximately 7{\%} of body weight. Balloon inflation produced a significant diuresis from both the intact and denervated kidneys but only produced a significant natriuresis from the intact kidney. Volume expansion (infusion of saline) produced a significant diuresis and natriuresis from both intact and denervated kidneys. Blocking the V2 receptor for vasopressin with a V2-specific receptor blocker d(CH2)5[olle2,Val4]AVP (40 μg/kg bolus dose followed by infusion of 4 μg/kg/min) did not alter the diuretic and natriuretic responses to volume expansion. However, the absence of renal nerves or the absence of actions of vasopressin produced a significant reduction in the capacity of the kidneys to increase the relative amount of diuresis or natriuresis, thus losing the control over output; i.e., absence of renal nerves only allowed 12-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state and absence of vasopressin only allowed 4.6-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state. Examining the “volume reflex” in terms of a control system trying to regulate fluid balance, the presence of either renal nerves or actions of vasopressin allows the volume regulating system a greater range in which to control the diuresis and natriuresis (making it possible to fine tune the output to much greater extent).",
author = "Patel, {Kaushik P.}",
year = "1991",
month = "4",
doi = "10.3181/00379727-196-43213",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "196",
pages = "438--443",
journal = "Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N. Y.)",
issn = "1535-3702",
publisher = "Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of Renal Nerves and Vasopressin in Renal Responses to Acute Volume Expansion in Rats

AU - Patel, Kaushik P.

PY - 1991/4

Y1 - 1991/4

N2 - This study was to determine whether the presence or absence of renal nerves and vasopressin altered the diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute volume expansion. Two forms of volume expansion were used: (i) inflation of a small balloon in the veno-atrial junction and (ii) an infusion of isotonic saline at a rate of 1 ml/min for a period of 15 min, approximately 7% of body weight. Balloon inflation produced a significant diuresis from both the intact and denervated kidneys but only produced a significant natriuresis from the intact kidney. Volume expansion (infusion of saline) produced a significant diuresis and natriuresis from both intact and denervated kidneys. Blocking the V2 receptor for vasopressin with a V2-specific receptor blocker d(CH2)5[olle2,Val4]AVP (40 μg/kg bolus dose followed by infusion of 4 μg/kg/min) did not alter the diuretic and natriuretic responses to volume expansion. However, the absence of renal nerves or the absence of actions of vasopressin produced a significant reduction in the capacity of the kidneys to increase the relative amount of diuresis or natriuresis, thus losing the control over output; i.e., absence of renal nerves only allowed 12-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state and absence of vasopressin only allowed 4.6-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state. Examining the “volume reflex” in terms of a control system trying to regulate fluid balance, the presence of either renal nerves or actions of vasopressin allows the volume regulating system a greater range in which to control the diuresis and natriuresis (making it possible to fine tune the output to much greater extent).

AB - This study was to determine whether the presence or absence of renal nerves and vasopressin altered the diuretic and natriuretic responses to acute volume expansion. Two forms of volume expansion were used: (i) inflation of a small balloon in the veno-atrial junction and (ii) an infusion of isotonic saline at a rate of 1 ml/min for a period of 15 min, approximately 7% of body weight. Balloon inflation produced a significant diuresis from both the intact and denervated kidneys but only produced a significant natriuresis from the intact kidney. Volume expansion (infusion of saline) produced a significant diuresis and natriuresis from both intact and denervated kidneys. Blocking the V2 receptor for vasopressin with a V2-specific receptor blocker d(CH2)5[olle2,Val4]AVP (40 μg/kg bolus dose followed by infusion of 4 μg/kg/min) did not alter the diuretic and natriuretic responses to volume expansion. However, the absence of renal nerves or the absence of actions of vasopressin produced a significant reduction in the capacity of the kidneys to increase the relative amount of diuresis or natriuresis, thus losing the control over output; i.e., absence of renal nerves only allowed 12-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state and absence of vasopressin only allowed 4.6-fold increase in diuresis to volume expansion compared with 25-fold in the intact state. Examining the “volume reflex” in terms of a control system trying to regulate fluid balance, the presence of either renal nerves or actions of vasopressin allows the volume regulating system a greater range in which to control the diuresis and natriuresis (making it possible to fine tune the output to much greater extent).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025765823&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025765823&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3181/00379727-196-43213

DO - 10.3181/00379727-196-43213

M3 - Article

C2 - 1826174

AN - SCOPUS:0025765823

VL - 196

SP - 438

EP - 443

JO - Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N. Y.)

JF - Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (New York, N. Y.)

SN - 1535-3702

IS - 4

ER -