Robust and Flexible Films from 100% Starch Cross-Linked by Biobased Disaccharide Derivative

Helan Xu, Hazal Canisag, Bingnan Mu, Yiqi Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this research, oxidized sucrose, a novel aldehyde-based green cross-linker, endowed starch films with substantial improvement in both tensile strength and elongation, whereas many other cross-linkers did not. Starch films are usually weak, brittle, and highly moisture sensitive, and thus have restricted industrial applications. Cross-linking is one of the most common methods to tackle these problems. However, most of the available cross-linkers are either toxic, expensive, or with low cross-linking efficiencies. Oxidized sucrose is a green cross-linker with multiple aldehyde groups per molecule to cross-link starch molecules via forming hemiacetals/acetals. The starch films cross-linked with oxidized sucrose had tensile strength and breaking elongation of 23 MPa and 60%, respectively, exceeding the cross-linking results of many other cross-linkers. Oxidized sucrose cross-linking also substantially increased the stability of starch films in both water and formic acid. With activation energy as low as 33.22 kJ mol-1, the cross-linking, a pseudo-first-order reaction, could occur readily. Mild cross-linking using oxidized sucrose might provide an alternative to promote industrialization of starch-based products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2631-2639
Number of pages9
JournalACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering
Volume3
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2015

Fingerprint

disaccharide
Disaccharides
Starch
starch
Sugar (sucrose)
sucrose
Sucrose
Derivatives
formic acid
aldehyde
Aldehydes
tensile strength
Elongation
Tensile strength
Acetals
Molecules
Poisons
Formic acid
industrialization
activation energy

Keywords

  • Biobased aldehyde
  • Flexible film
  • Lowly toxic cross-linker
  • Oxidized sucrose
  • Starch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

Cite this

Robust and Flexible Films from 100% Starch Cross-Linked by Biobased Disaccharide Derivative. / Xu, Helan; Canisag, Hazal; Mu, Bingnan; Yang, Yiqi.

In: ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, Vol. 3, No. 11, 08.10.2015, p. 2631-2639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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