Robotic urological surgery in patients with prior abdominal operations is not associated with increased complications

Tanya Nazemi, Anton Galich, Lynette M Smith, K. C. Balaji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The da Vinci Surgical Robotic System is being increasingly used to perform complex urological operations by minimally invasive techniques. Prior abdominal surgery associated with intra-abdominal adhesions may complicate robotic surgery. Methods: We used a cohort of consecutive 49 patients undergoing a variety of robotic urological procedures at our institution to study the impact of prior abdominal operations on early perioperative complications. Results: A total of 21/49 (43%) patients (Group A) had no history of prior abdominal surgery and the rest 28/49 (57%; Group B) had undergone prior abdominal surgery. The incidence of peritoneal adhesions was significantly higher in patients with prior abdominal surgery compared to the rest of the cohort, 54% versus 10% (P = 0.002). The median operative time, estimated blood loss, postoperative drop in hemoglobin, time to hospital discharge, postoperative narcotic analgesic use and postoperative complication rate between group A and group B were not statistically different. The overall perioperative complication rate for the entire cohort was 14.3%, with 6-8% of complications occurring in each of the two groups (P = 1.0). Comparative subset analysis of 28 patients in Group B, 15 (54%) and 13 (46%) with or without intra-abdominal adhesions did not reveal a significant difference in perioperative complication rates either. However, operative time was longer in patients with intra-abdominal adhesions compared to patients without, median of 590 (281-922) and 434 (153-723) min respectively, although not statistically significant (P = 0.059). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that robotic urological surgery can be performed in patients with prior abdominal surgery without increased perioperative complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-251
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Urology
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

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Robotics
Operative Time
Postoperative Hemorrhage
Narcotics
Hemoglobins
Incidence

Keywords

  • Abdominal surgery
  • Adhesions
  • Laparoscopy
  • Robot
  • Urological surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Robotic urological surgery in patients with prior abdominal operations is not associated with increased complications. / Nazemi, Tanya; Galich, Anton; Smith, Lynette M; Balaji, K. C.

In: International Journal of Urology, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.03.2006, p. 248-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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