Risk factors and outcomes of staphylococcus aureus infections after small bowel and multivisceral transplantation

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Abstract

Background: No studies have evaluated the risk factors and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections in small bowel (SBT) and multivisceral (including small bowel) transplantation (MVT). Methods: SBT and MVT recipients with SA infections (22 cases) were retrospectively identified and compared with matched non-SA-infected recipient controls (44). The characteristics were compared with Friedman and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors, and Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox proportional hazard model were performed for survival analysis. Results: The median age was 2.07 years (range, 0.76-54.04). Forty-three percent of the first SA infections were bloodstream infections, 30% lung infections, and 26% surgical site infections; 36% of these isolates were methicillin-resistant SA. Median time (days) to surgical site infections (41.0; range, 0-89) was significantly shorter than that to lung infections (266; range, 130-378) (P = 0.01). By univariate analysis, it was found that cases were more likely to have cytomegalovirus (CMV) sero-mismatch (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03 [95% confidence interval, 0.88-10.43]; P = 0.08), and controls were more likely to receive mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment (0.09 [0.001-0.82]; P = 0.03). By multivariable analysis, patients with CMV sero-mismatch were found to have higher odds of developing SA infection (OR, 2.92; P = 0.085), whereas MMF had a protective effect (OR, 0.08; P = 0.031), adjusting for matched criteria. SA cases had shorter survival than controls (mean survival, 28.5 vs. 45.8 months [P = 0.04]) and were 2.18 times more likely to die (1.02-4.67, P = 0.04). Conclusions: SA infections were associated with a significant shorter survival time and higher risk of death. The presence of CMV sero-mismatch and the absence of MMF treatment were found to be the risk factors for SA infections after SBT and MVT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-29
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Staphylococcus aureus
Transplantation
Infection
Mycophenolic Acid
Cytomegalovirus
Surgical Wound Infection
Odds Ratio
Survival
Lung
Survival Analysis
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Proportional Hazards Models
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • S. aureus
  • infection
  • multivisceral
  • small bowel
  • transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

@article{25abc56da91b499a993048de3a23ece3,
title = "Risk factors and outcomes of staphylococcus aureus infections after small bowel and multivisceral transplantation",
abstract = "Background: No studies have evaluated the risk factors and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections in small bowel (SBT) and multivisceral (including small bowel) transplantation (MVT). Methods: SBT and MVT recipients with SA infections (22 cases) were retrospectively identified and compared with matched non-SA-infected recipient controls (44). The characteristics were compared with Friedman and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors, and Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox proportional hazard model were performed for survival analysis. Results: The median age was 2.07 years (range, 0.76-54.04). Forty-three percent of the first SA infections were bloodstream infections, 30{\%} lung infections, and 26{\%} surgical site infections; 36{\%} of these isolates were methicillin-resistant SA. Median time (days) to surgical site infections (41.0; range, 0-89) was significantly shorter than that to lung infections (266; range, 130-378) (P = 0.01). By univariate analysis, it was found that cases were more likely to have cytomegalovirus (CMV) sero-mismatch (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03 [95{\%} confidence interval, 0.88-10.43]; P = 0.08), and controls were more likely to receive mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment (0.09 [0.001-0.82]; P = 0.03). By multivariable analysis, patients with CMV sero-mismatch were found to have higher odds of developing SA infection (OR, 2.92; P = 0.085), whereas MMF had a protective effect (OR, 0.08; P = 0.031), adjusting for matched criteria. SA cases had shorter survival than controls (mean survival, 28.5 vs. 45.8 months [P = 0.04]) and were 2.18 times more likely to die (1.02-4.67, P = 0.04). Conclusions: SA infections were associated with a significant shorter survival time and higher risk of death. The presence of CMV sero-mismatch and the absence of MMF treatment were found to be the risk factors for SA infections after SBT and MVT.",
keywords = "S. aureus, infection, multivisceral, small bowel, transplantation",
author = "Florescu, {Diana F} and Fang Qiu and Renuga Vivekanandan and Mercer, {David F} and Langnas, {Alan Norman} and Kalil, {Andre C}",
year = "2012",
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language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "25--29",
journal = "Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors and outcomes of staphylococcus aureus infections after small bowel and multivisceral transplantation

AU - Florescu, Diana F

AU - Qiu, Fang

AU - Vivekanandan, Renuga

AU - Mercer, David F

AU - Langnas, Alan Norman

AU - Kalil, Andre C

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - Background: No studies have evaluated the risk factors and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections in small bowel (SBT) and multivisceral (including small bowel) transplantation (MVT). Methods: SBT and MVT recipients with SA infections (22 cases) were retrospectively identified and compared with matched non-SA-infected recipient controls (44). The characteristics were compared with Friedman and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors, and Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox proportional hazard model were performed for survival analysis. Results: The median age was 2.07 years (range, 0.76-54.04). Forty-three percent of the first SA infections were bloodstream infections, 30% lung infections, and 26% surgical site infections; 36% of these isolates were methicillin-resistant SA. Median time (days) to surgical site infections (41.0; range, 0-89) was significantly shorter than that to lung infections (266; range, 130-378) (P = 0.01). By univariate analysis, it was found that cases were more likely to have cytomegalovirus (CMV) sero-mismatch (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03 [95% confidence interval, 0.88-10.43]; P = 0.08), and controls were more likely to receive mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment (0.09 [0.001-0.82]; P = 0.03). By multivariable analysis, patients with CMV sero-mismatch were found to have higher odds of developing SA infection (OR, 2.92; P = 0.085), whereas MMF had a protective effect (OR, 0.08; P = 0.031), adjusting for matched criteria. SA cases had shorter survival than controls (mean survival, 28.5 vs. 45.8 months [P = 0.04]) and were 2.18 times more likely to die (1.02-4.67, P = 0.04). Conclusions: SA infections were associated with a significant shorter survival time and higher risk of death. The presence of CMV sero-mismatch and the absence of MMF treatment were found to be the risk factors for SA infections after SBT and MVT.

AB - Background: No studies have evaluated the risk factors and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) infections in small bowel (SBT) and multivisceral (including small bowel) transplantation (MVT). Methods: SBT and MVT recipients with SA infections (22 cases) were retrospectively identified and compared with matched non-SA-infected recipient controls (44). The characteristics were compared with Friedman and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors, and Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox proportional hazard model were performed for survival analysis. Results: The median age was 2.07 years (range, 0.76-54.04). Forty-three percent of the first SA infections were bloodstream infections, 30% lung infections, and 26% surgical site infections; 36% of these isolates were methicillin-resistant SA. Median time (days) to surgical site infections (41.0; range, 0-89) was significantly shorter than that to lung infections (266; range, 130-378) (P = 0.01). By univariate analysis, it was found that cases were more likely to have cytomegalovirus (CMV) sero-mismatch (odds ratio [OR] = 3.03 [95% confidence interval, 0.88-10.43]; P = 0.08), and controls were more likely to receive mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment (0.09 [0.001-0.82]; P = 0.03). By multivariable analysis, patients with CMV sero-mismatch were found to have higher odds of developing SA infection (OR, 2.92; P = 0.085), whereas MMF had a protective effect (OR, 0.08; P = 0.031), adjusting for matched criteria. SA cases had shorter survival than controls (mean survival, 28.5 vs. 45.8 months [P = 0.04]) and were 2.18 times more likely to die (1.02-4.67, P = 0.04). Conclusions: SA infections were associated with a significant shorter survival time and higher risk of death. The presence of CMV sero-mismatch and the absence of MMF treatment were found to be the risk factors for SA infections after SBT and MVT.

KW - S. aureus

KW - infection

KW - multivisceral

KW - small bowel

KW - transplantation

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DO - 10.1097/INF.0b013e3182310fb6

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