Rising Social Inequalities in US Childhood Obesity, 2003-2007

Gopal K. Singh, Mohammad Siahpush, Michael D. Kogan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

252 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study examines changes between 2003 and 2007 in obesity and overweight prevalence among U.S. children and adolescents 10 to 17 years of age from detailed racial/ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Methods: The 2003 (N = 46,707) and 2007 (N = 44,101) National Survey of Children's Health were used to calculate overweight and obesity prevalence (body mass index [BMI] ≥85th and ≥95th percentiles, respectively). Logistic regression was used to model odds of obesity. Results: In 2007, 16.4% of U.S. children were obese and 31.6% were overweight. From 2003 to 2007, obesity prevalence increased by 10% for all U.S. children but increased by 23%-33% for children in low-education, low-income, and higher unemployment households. Obesity prevalence increased markedly among Hispanic children and children from single-mother households. In 2007, Hispanic, non-Hispanic White, and American Indian children had 3.0-3.8 times higher odds of obesity and overweight than Asian children; children from low-income and low-education households had 3.4-4.3 times higher odds of obesity than children from higher socioeconomic households. The magnitude of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in obesity and overweight prevalence increased between 2003 and 2007, with substantial social inequalities persisting even after controlling for behavioral factors. Conclusions: Social inequalities in obesity and overweight prevalence increased because of more rapid increases in prevalence among children in lower socioeconomic groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-52
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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Pediatric Obesity
Obesity
Hispanic Americans
Education
Unemployment
North American Indians
Ethnic Groups
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Mothers

Keywords

  • Change
  • Childhood and Adolescent Obesity
  • Race/Ethnicity
  • Social Inequality
  • Socioeconomic Status
  • Trend
  • United States

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Rising Social Inequalities in US Childhood Obesity, 2003-2007. / Singh, Gopal K.; Siahpush, Mohammad; Kogan, Michael D.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 40-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, Gopal K. ; Siahpush, Mohammad ; Kogan, Michael D. / Rising Social Inequalities in US Childhood Obesity, 2003-2007. In: Annals of Epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 40-52.
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