Rheumatoid arthritis

James Robert O'Dell, Josef S. Smolen, Daniel Aletaha, Dwight R. Robinson, E. William St. Clair

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects all ethnic groups. Women are nearly three times more likely than men to develop the disease. The pattern of arthritis typically favors distal and symmetrical involvement. The most commonly involved joints are the wrists, metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints. However, many other joints can also be involved. Shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, or neck disease (particularly at the atlanto-axial joint, C1-C2) are frequently observed. Most presentations are subacute in nature, with the insidious onset of fatigue, morning stiffness, and arthritis. More explosive onsets of disease are also described. If untreated, RA is a chronic, progressive disorder that leads to joint damage, disability, and early mortality. A variety of extraarticular features are typical of seropositive RA (RA associated with the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum). These include rheumatoid nodules, secondary Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung disease, scleritis, and rheumatoid vasculitis. Approximately 70% of patients with RA are rheumatoid factor positive. An approximately equal percentage has antibodies directed against cyclic citrullinated peptides (i.e., anti-CCP antibodies). There is substantial but not complete overlap between groups of patients who are rheumatoid factor positive and those who have anti-CCP antibodies. Some patients have RA that appears in every way to be typical disease yet do not have either rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies. These patients are said to have "seronegative RA". Radiographic studies in RA reveal joint space narrowing, erosions, deformities, and periarticular osteopenia. Treatment approaches now emphasize early interventions designed to suppress joint inflammation entirely as soon as possible after the onset of clinical disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationA Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology
PublisherSpringer London
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9781848009332
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Rheumatoid Factor
Joints
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Arthritis
Rheumatoid Vasculitis
Atlanto-Axial Joint
Rheumatoid Nodule
Scleritis
Wrist Joint
Metatarsophalangeal Joint
Metacarpophalangeal Joint
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Interstitial Lung Diseases
Elbow
Ethnic Groups
Fatigue
Hip
Knee
Neck

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

O'Dell, J. R., Smolen, J. S., Aletaha, D., Robinson, D. R., & St. Clair, E. W. (2009). Rheumatoid arthritis. In A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology (pp. 1-13). Springer London. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-934-9_1

Rheumatoid arthritis. / O'Dell, James Robert; Smolen, Josef S.; Aletaha, Daniel; Robinson, Dwight R.; St. Clair, E. William.

A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology. Springer London, 2009. p. 1-13.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

O'Dell, JR, Smolen, JS, Aletaha, D, Robinson, DR & St. Clair, EW 2009, Rheumatoid arthritis. in A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology. Springer London, pp. 1-13. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-934-9_1
O'Dell JR, Smolen JS, Aletaha D, Robinson DR, St. Clair EW. Rheumatoid arthritis. In A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology. Springer London. 2009. p. 1-13 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-84800-934-9_1
O'Dell, James Robert ; Smolen, Josef S. ; Aletaha, Daniel ; Robinson, Dwight R. ; St. Clair, E. William. / Rheumatoid arthritis. A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology. Springer London, 2009. pp. 1-13
@inbook{17e32c30570f4a1eb32ec1aa7df62a3e,
title = "Rheumatoid arthritis",
abstract = "Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects all ethnic groups. Women are nearly three times more likely than men to develop the disease. The pattern of arthritis typically favors distal and symmetrical involvement. The most commonly involved joints are the wrists, metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints. However, many other joints can also be involved. Shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, or neck disease (particularly at the atlanto-axial joint, C1-C2) are frequently observed. Most presentations are subacute in nature, with the insidious onset of fatigue, morning stiffness, and arthritis. More explosive onsets of disease are also described. If untreated, RA is a chronic, progressive disorder that leads to joint damage, disability, and early mortality. A variety of extraarticular features are typical of seropositive RA (RA associated with the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum). These include rheumatoid nodules, secondary Sj{\"o}gren's syndrome, interstitial lung disease, scleritis, and rheumatoid vasculitis. Approximately 70{\%} of patients with RA are rheumatoid factor positive. An approximately equal percentage has antibodies directed against cyclic citrullinated peptides (i.e., anti-CCP antibodies). There is substantial but not complete overlap between groups of patients who are rheumatoid factor positive and those who have anti-CCP antibodies. Some patients have RA that appears in every way to be typical disease yet do not have either rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies. These patients are said to have {"}seronegative RA{"}. Radiographic studies in RA reveal joint space narrowing, erosions, deformities, and periarticular osteopenia. Treatment approaches now emphasize early interventions designed to suppress joint inflammation entirely as soon as possible after the onset of clinical disease.",
author = "O'Dell, {James Robert} and Smolen, {Josef S.} and Daniel Aletaha and Robinson, {Dwight R.} and {St. Clair}, {E. William}",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-84800-934-9_1",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781848009332",
pages = "1--13",
booktitle = "A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology",
publisher = "Springer London",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Rheumatoid arthritis

AU - O'Dell, James Robert

AU - Smolen, Josef S.

AU - Aletaha, Daniel

AU - Robinson, Dwight R.

AU - St. Clair, E. William

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects all ethnic groups. Women are nearly three times more likely than men to develop the disease. The pattern of arthritis typically favors distal and symmetrical involvement. The most commonly involved joints are the wrists, metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints. However, many other joints can also be involved. Shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, or neck disease (particularly at the atlanto-axial joint, C1-C2) are frequently observed. Most presentations are subacute in nature, with the insidious onset of fatigue, morning stiffness, and arthritis. More explosive onsets of disease are also described. If untreated, RA is a chronic, progressive disorder that leads to joint damage, disability, and early mortality. A variety of extraarticular features are typical of seropositive RA (RA associated with the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum). These include rheumatoid nodules, secondary Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung disease, scleritis, and rheumatoid vasculitis. Approximately 70% of patients with RA are rheumatoid factor positive. An approximately equal percentage has antibodies directed against cyclic citrullinated peptides (i.e., anti-CCP antibodies). There is substantial but not complete overlap between groups of patients who are rheumatoid factor positive and those who have anti-CCP antibodies. Some patients have RA that appears in every way to be typical disease yet do not have either rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies. These patients are said to have "seronegative RA". Radiographic studies in RA reveal joint space narrowing, erosions, deformities, and periarticular osteopenia. Treatment approaches now emphasize early interventions designed to suppress joint inflammation entirely as soon as possible after the onset of clinical disease.

AB - Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects all ethnic groups. Women are nearly three times more likely than men to develop the disease. The pattern of arthritis typically favors distal and symmetrical involvement. The most commonly involved joints are the wrists, metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metatarsophalangeal joints. However, many other joints can also be involved. Shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, or neck disease (particularly at the atlanto-axial joint, C1-C2) are frequently observed. Most presentations are subacute in nature, with the insidious onset of fatigue, morning stiffness, and arthritis. More explosive onsets of disease are also described. If untreated, RA is a chronic, progressive disorder that leads to joint damage, disability, and early mortality. A variety of extraarticular features are typical of seropositive RA (RA associated with the presence of rheumatoid factor in the serum). These include rheumatoid nodules, secondary Sjögren's syndrome, interstitial lung disease, scleritis, and rheumatoid vasculitis. Approximately 70% of patients with RA are rheumatoid factor positive. An approximately equal percentage has antibodies directed against cyclic citrullinated peptides (i.e., anti-CCP antibodies). There is substantial but not complete overlap between groups of patients who are rheumatoid factor positive and those who have anti-CCP antibodies. Some patients have RA that appears in every way to be typical disease yet do not have either rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies. These patients are said to have "seronegative RA". Radiographic studies in RA reveal joint space narrowing, erosions, deformities, and periarticular osteopenia. Treatment approaches now emphasize early interventions designed to suppress joint inflammation entirely as soon as possible after the onset of clinical disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84889978721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84889978721&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-84800-934-9_1

DO - 10.1007/978-1-84800-934-9_1

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84889978721

SN - 9781848009332

SP - 1

EP - 13

BT - A Clinician's Pearls and Myths in Rheumatology

PB - Springer London

ER -