'Returning to normal' following bone marrow transplantation

Outcomes, expectations and informed consent

M. A. Andrykowski, M. J. Brady, Carl Bruce Greiner, E. M. Altmaier, T. G. Burish, J. H. Antin, R. Gingrich, C. McGarigle, P. J. Henslee-Downey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The psychosocial impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was investigated in 172 disease-free adult BMT survivors drawn from five different BMT treatment centers. Respondents were a mean of 43.5 months after BMT. Both questionnaire and interview assessments were utilized. Survivors' perceptions of whether they had 'returned to normal' following BMT, recollections of pre-BMT expectations for returning to normal and current psychological distress were assessed. The results indicated that only a minority of respondents considered themselves to have 'returned to normal' following BMT. Reports of less than normal physical, cognitive, occupational, sexual and/or interpersonal functioning were common. In contrast, few patients reported pre-BMT expectations for such. Discordance between pre-BMT expectations for returning to normal and current functional status was associated with greater current psychological distress. Finally, despite the presence of any functional deficits and despite any discordance between pre-BMT expectations and current functional status, survivors' evaluations of their decision to pursue BMT were generally quite positive. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for: (1) the process of obtaining informed consent for BMT, and (2) clinical strategies for enhancing post-BMT psychological adjustment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)573-581
Number of pages9
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Informed Consent
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Survivors
Psychology
Interviews

Keywords

  • 'Returning to normal'

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Andrykowski, M. A., Brady, M. J., Greiner, C. B., Altmaier, E. M., Burish, T. G., Antin, J. H., ... Henslee-Downey, P. J. (1995). 'Returning to normal' following bone marrow transplantation: Outcomes, expectations and informed consent. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 15(4), 573-581.

'Returning to normal' following bone marrow transplantation : Outcomes, expectations and informed consent. / Andrykowski, M. A.; Brady, M. J.; Greiner, Carl Bruce; Altmaier, E. M.; Burish, T. G.; Antin, J. H.; Gingrich, R.; McGarigle, C.; Henslee-Downey, P. J.

In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.01.1995, p. 573-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrykowski, MA, Brady, MJ, Greiner, CB, Altmaier, EM, Burish, TG, Antin, JH, Gingrich, R, McGarigle, C & Henslee-Downey, PJ 1995, ''Returning to normal' following bone marrow transplantation: Outcomes, expectations and informed consent', Bone Marrow Transplantation, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 573-581.
Andrykowski MA, Brady MJ, Greiner CB, Altmaier EM, Burish TG, Antin JH et al. 'Returning to normal' following bone marrow transplantation: Outcomes, expectations and informed consent. Bone Marrow Transplantation. 1995 Jan 1;15(4):573-581.
Andrykowski, M. A. ; Brady, M. J. ; Greiner, Carl Bruce ; Altmaier, E. M. ; Burish, T. G. ; Antin, J. H. ; Gingrich, R. ; McGarigle, C. ; Henslee-Downey, P. J. / 'Returning to normal' following bone marrow transplantation : Outcomes, expectations and informed consent. In: Bone Marrow Transplantation. 1995 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 573-581.
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