Renal Responses of the Recumbent Nonhuman Primate to Total Body Water Immersion

T. V. Peterson, J. P. Gilmore, Irving H Zucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Experiments were performed to determine the extent to which thoracic translocation of blood and abdominal compression contribute to the diuresis and natriuresis during head-out water immersion in the anesthetized nonhuman primate. Neither a diuresis nor natriuresis occurred in animals immersed in the recumbent posture to a depth such that the abdomen was subjected to the same water pressure as during head-out upright immersion. It is concluded that the abdominal compression observed during upright immersion does not contribute per se to the renal responses and that the immersion-induced translocation of blood to the thorax may be the causal factor during this volume stimulus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-265
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine
Volume161
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

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Body Water
Immersion
Primates
Blood
Kidney
Natriuresis
Water
Diuresis
Animals
Thorax
Head
Posture
Abdomen
Experiments
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Renal Responses of the Recumbent Nonhuman Primate to Total Body Water Immersion. / Peterson, T. V.; Gilmore, J. P.; Zucker, Irving H.

In: Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, Vol. 161, No. 3, 01.01.1979, p. 260-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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