Remote Electrocardiographic in Acute Myocardial Monitoring Infarction

Integration Into the Overall System of Coronary Care

Harold G. Danford, David Alan Danford, John E. Mielke, Thomas A. Ryan, Lowell F. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A system of continuous remote electrocardiographic monitoring, from four small hospitals to a central hospital coronary care unit, was applied to 130 patients with confirmed acute myocardial infarctions. The mortality survey of 19 months& experience with this system revealed a hospital mortality of 27%. An analysis of 149 consecutive myocardial infarctions in the same hospitals prior to the initiation of remote monitoring of the electrocardiogram showed a hospital mortality of 38%. Thirty-nine patients with myocardial infarctions who were treated concurrently with the monitored patients, but without remote monitoring, had a mortality of 44%. The two coronary care units, from which remote monitoring and medical support were provided, treated 516 cases of acute myocardial infarction during a similar interval, with a hospital mortality of 19%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)998-1001
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume223
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 1973

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Hospital Mortality
Myocardial Infarction
Coronary Care Units
Mortality
Electrocardiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Remote Electrocardiographic in Acute Myocardial Monitoring Infarction : Integration Into the Overall System of Coronary Care. / Danford, Harold G.; Danford, David Alan; Mielke, John E.; Ryan, Thomas A.; Peterson, Lowell F.

In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 223, No. 9, 26.02.1973, p. 998-1001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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