Relative status and emotion regulation in workplace meetings: A conceptual model

Jane Shumski Thomas, Joseph A. Allen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emotion regulation is the human ability to manipulate or control the experience of and the expression of emotions. Recent research demonstrates that emotion regulation occurs in workplace meetings. In this chapter, we describe workplace meetings as emotion regulation episodes and construct a multilevel conceptual model of emotion regulation in workplace meetings. Drawing on status characteristics theories, we develop a series of propositions to suggest that power and status dynamics are predictive of emotion regulation in workplace meetings. We also propose individual (e.g., personality) and group-level (e.g., psychological safety climate) differences that may affect the relationship between status and emotion regulation. Finally, we discuss the outcomes of emotion regulation in workplace meetings and provide suggestions for meeting facilitators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Cambridge Handbook of Meeting Science
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages440-455
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781107589735
ISBN (Print)9781107067189
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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Keywords

  • Emotion regulation
  • Emotional labor
  • Hierarchy
  • Meetings
  • Status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Thomas, J. S., & Allen, J. A. (2015). Relative status and emotion regulation in workplace meetings: A conceptual model. In The Cambridge Handbook of Meeting Science (pp. 440-455). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107589735.019